diethylpropion

diethylpropion

 [di-eth″il-pro´pe-on]
a sympathomimetic amine used as an oral anorectic in the form of the hydrochloride salt.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also in 2000, the European Medicines agency (EMA) recommended the market withdrawal of several anti-obesity drugs, including phentermine, diethylpropion, and mazindol, due to an unfavorable risk to benefit ratio.
Pharmacological and neurotoxicological actions mediated by bupropion and diethylpropion. Int Rev Neurobiol 2009; 88: 223-55.
Phentermine, diethylpropion, phendimetrazine, and benzphetamine have remained on the US market, with phentermine being the most prescribed weight loss drug in this class, as well as among all approved antiobesity drugs.
Diethylpropion. Diethylpropion, a sympathomimetic amine similar to amphetamine, is a prodrug metabolized to 2-ethylamino-1-phenyl-propan-1-one and N, N-diethylnorephedrine metabolites [165], the latter being responsible for its effects.
Central noradrenergic agents (phentermine, diethylpropion, phendimetrazine, and benzphetamine) have been available since the 1950s.
Centrally acting sympathomimetics, such as the amphetamine derivatives desoxyephedrine, phentermine and diethylpropion, were among the earliest pharmacological agents used for weight loss.
Primary pulmonary hypertension after amfepramone (diethylpropion) with BMPR2 mutation.
The same goes for Diethylpropion, another potentially addictive medication available in the U.S.
Another recommendation is that phentermine and diethylpropion (Tenuate) should not be used in patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure or a history of heart disease.
The FDA has approved four drugs for short-term use (up to 12 weeks) that suppress appetite: phentermine, benzphetamine, diethylpropion, and phendimetrazine.
Also, diethylpropion and benzphetamine pass into breast milk.