dietary supplement


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dietary supplement

n.
A product containing one or more vitamins, herbs, enzymes, amino acids, or other ingredients, that is taken orally to supplement one's diet, as by providing a missing nutrient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, under the current regulatory scheme, while one dietary supplement ingredient may be removed from the market, another one not only takes its place but is allowed to be advertised as a safe alternative (Crabtree 2004).
Around 2007, FDA attorneys in Rockville, MD, began instructing FDA inspectors in the field to tell manufacturers of nutritional supplements that they must add the words dietary supplement to their product labels.
The findings suggest that chronic kidney disease patients and their physicians may be unaware of the dangers associated with supplementation, and also that physicians may be unaware that their patients are taking dietary supplements, Dr.
The use of dietary supplements has grown rapidly over the past several decades, and are now used by more than half of the adult population in the United States (US).
PEOPLE who take dietary supplements may fall into the trap of indulging themselves by tucking into their favourite unhealthy fast foods, a new report warned yesterday.
Comprehension of the complexity of regulations and the definition of dietary supplements is essential in educating clients regarding appropriate use of supplements.
Todays safety warning is just one of many steps the FDA is taking to adapt to the realities of the evolving dietary supplement industry.
With the growth of the dietary supplement industry, more problems have arisen in the segment with the marketing of dangerous and misleading products, which can impact consumer health, it said.
adults aged 55+ take dietary supplements, followed by those aged 35-54 (77%) and 18-34 (69%).
Myth: Omega-3 dietary supplements improve cardiovascular health.
Asia-Pacific was the largest market for dietary supplements globally in 2016, according to Zion Market Research.
Yet this confidence cannot be held for dietary supplements. Dietary supplements do not look like food or medicine; they are packaged, purified ingredients and can be found containing illicit pharmaceuticals.