diencephalon


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diencephalon

 [di″en-sef´ah-lon]
1. the posterior part of the prosencephalon, consisting of the hypothalamus, thalamus, metathalamus, and epithalamus; the subthalamus is often considered to be a distinct division. See also brainstem.
2. the posterior of the two brain vesicles formed by specialization of the prosencephalon in the developing embryo. See illustration.
Diencephalon. Posterior (dorsal) A and anterior (inferior) B views of the base of the brain, showing the diencephalon in relation to the mesencephalon (midbrain) and rhombencephalon (hindbrain). From Dorland's, 2000.

di·en·ceph·a·lon

, pl.

di·en·ceph·a·la

(dī'en-sef'ă-lon, -sef'ă-lă), [TA]
The caudal part of the prosencephalon composed of the dorsal thalamus (or thalamus) epithalamus, subthalamus, and hypothalamus. the geniculate bodies, sometimes referred to as the metathalamus, are actualy part of the thalamus.
[G. dia, through, + enkephalos, brain]

diencephalon

/di·en·ceph·a·lon/ (di″en-sef´ah-lon)
1. the posterior part of the forebrain, consisting of the hypothalamus, thalamus, metathalamus, and epithalamus; the subthalamus is often recognized as a distinct division.
Enlarge picture
Diencephalon. Posterior (dorsal) (A) and anterior (inferior) (B) views of the base of the brain, showing the diencephalon in relation to the mesencephalon (midbrain) and rhombencephalon (hindbrain).
2. the posterior of the two brain vesicles formed by specialization in embryonic development. See also brain stem. diencephal´ic

diencephalon

(dī′ĕn-sĕf′ə-lŏn′, -lən)
n.
The posterior part of the forebrain that connects the midbrain with the cerebral hemispheres, encloses the third ventricle, and contains the thalamus and hypothalamus. Also called betweenbrain, interbrain.

di·en·ce·phal′ic (-sə-făl′ĭk) adj.

diencephalon

[dī′ənsef′əlon]
Etymology: Gk, di + enkephalon, brain
the portion of the brain between the cerebrum and the mesencephalon. It consists of the hypothalamus, thalamus, metathalamus, and the epithalamus and includes most of the third ventricle.
enlarge picture
Diencephalon

di·en·ceph·a·lon

, pl. diencephala (dī'en-sef'ă-lon, -lă) [TA]
That part of the prosencephalon composed of the epithalamus, dorsal thalamus, subthalamus, and hypothalamus.
[G. dia, through, + enkephalos, brain]

diencephalon

The central, lower part of the brain that contains the BASAL GANGLIA, THE THALAMUS, the HYPOTHALAMUS, the PITUITARY gland.

diencephalon

the part of the forebrain that contains the thalamus and hypothalamus and lies beneath the cerebral hemispheres.

Diencephalon

A part of the brain that binds the mesencephalon to the cerebral hemispheres. Considered by some as part of the brain stem.
Mentioned in: Korsakoff's Syndrome

diencephalon

collective term denoting thalamus, subthalamus and hypothalamus

diencephalon

1. the caudal part of the forebrain, consisting of the hypothalamus, thalamus, metathalamus and epithalamus; the subthalamus is often considered to be a distinct division.
2. the more caudal of the two brain vesicles formed by specialization of the prosencephalon in the developing embryo. See also brainstem.
References in periodicals archive ?
The THC projects from the ventral diencephalon to form the habenular commissure (Figure 4(c)).
As this process occurs, the choroid plexus develops from blood vessels that invade the ventricles from the diencephalon and the myelencephalon.
The hypothalamus is located dorsal to the pituitary gland in the ventral and medial region of the diencephalon, directly beneath the massa intermedia of thalamus.
Sex differences in diencephalon serotonin transporter availability in major depression.
The hypothalamus lies at the base of the brain in the diencephalon, and controls many endocrine functions.
The common insult in all cases of BIND results from a total serum bilirubin (TSB) concentration that exceeds the infant's neuroprotective defenses and leads to neuronal injury, primarily in the basal ganglia, central and peripheral auditory pathways, hippocampus, diencephalon, subthalamic nuclei, midbrain, cerebellum and pontine and brain-stem nuclei for oculomotor function and for respiratory, neurohumoral, and electrolyte control.
Numerous sites of dysfunction have been speculated, from the upper brain stem and diencephalon (Bullard), brain stem (Cartlidge & Shaw, 1981), orbital frontal cortex (Strum, 2002), and, more specifically, the anterior hypothalamus or medulla (Boeve et al.
At 29 hours, the optic vesicle, which later gives rise to the optic cup, was visible as an extension of the diencephalon.
The target is presented to one eye and the information is conveyed to two regions of the brain, the optic tectum and the nucleus rostrolateralis in the diencephalon.
These impulses, emotions, and feelings are located in the diencephalon, which is well developed in many other species of animals, especially mammals and birds.
30 The device is designed for non-drug treatment of diencephalon disorders, pain syndrome of different ethiology, and localization.
Destruction of a critical array of neurons within the "whole" brain (hemispheres, diencephalon, and brain stem) is necessary for death because: 1) the vital functions of respiration and control of circulation are subserved by the brain stem; 2) the critical integrative functions are subserved by both the brain stem and hypothalamus; and 3) the wakefulness component of consciousness is subserved by the brain stem and the awareness component of consciousness by the thalamus and cerebral cortex.