didactic

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di·dac·tic

(dī-dak'tik),
Instructive; denoting medical teaching by lectures or textbooks, as distinguished from clinical demonstrations involving patients or laboratory exercises.
[G. didaktikos, fr. didaskō, to teach]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

didactic

adjective Referring to teaching; instructive; with explicit rules.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·dac·tic

(dī-dak'tik)
Instructive; denoting medical teaching by lectures or textbooks, as distinguished from clinical demonstrations with patients or laboratory exercises.
[G. didaktikos, fr. didaskō, to teach]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Didacticism takes different forms and can easily be contained in a story irrespective of the nature of problem the writer aims at correcting through his story and irrespective of the kind of European form the writer imports to tell his story.
The conversation about didacticism is really a conversation about design, as evinced by Carroll's claim that didacticism "leaves out too much of what is peculiar and specific to art." He is referring here to the subjective, emotional, aesthetic, and qualitative aspects of art.
Murphy concludes that the version of Edgeworthian childhood that Edgeworth unfolds in her works is aspirational as well as selective and that their didacticism revolves around the romanticized message that the reader who faithfully replicates the theories unfolded in the tales will inevitably produce an "ideal" child and ultimately an ideal adult.
Didacticism, at least according to everything I have heard and read about modern teaching in primary, secondary, and postsecondary education, runs counter to the way many of us have been taught to teach.
She resists didacticism, instead forcing us to take nothing for granted.
It remains to be seen whether abandoning the search for universally accepted signs and metaphors, and the rise of a new didacticism will constrict the visual impact of the new monuments and limit the ranks of the public to the Stendhalian 'happy few'.
Benedicte Boudu examines Henri Estienne's Commentariolus (1578) on Cicero's Epistolae familiares, characterizing it as a veritable reditus ad fontes, calculated to free humanists from devotion to Ciceronian didacticism. According to Boudu, Estienne saw his task less as prescribing correct usage than as finding and recreating the full semantic range of Cicero's Vocabulary.
Claiming that "didacticism now turns playfully ironic as the play explores theatre's emotional life" (75), he offers an interesting interpretation of Gammer Gurton's methodology and achievements.
Despite this important insight, "Ghosts" is, unfortunately, also replete with the sort of banal didacticism that mars much of the book.
Gubser is, of course, not the first to discover this, but he does it with so much didacticism and so deductively that one is overwhelmed by the evidence, especially in the case of Soil und Haben, which is perhaps the best chapter of the book.
Whilst the discours d'apparat typically blend (in various proportions) eulogy, and above all praise of the King, with didacticism, these recurring themes are skilfully exploited to suit the context and to lend a freshness to the discourse, so that in the case of the French Academy, preoccupied above all with the codification of French, the King is praised principally for his linguistic skills, whilst in the parlements he is held up as the perfect judge.
Not that there's necessarily anything wrong with a good dose of socially aware didacticism and, for all its kitchen sink limitations, the production, made up of unknowns and built upon improvisation, has a raw power that transcends sometimes shaky plotting and dramatic foundations with the bare bones of workshopping showing through.