dichotomous


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di·chot·o·mous

(dī-kot'ō-mŭs),
Denoting or characterized by dichotomy.
Synonym(s): dichotic (1)

dichotomous

  1. (of a plant, such as many algal species) branching by repeated division into two equal parts.
  2. (of characters) choosing between two possibilities. See KEY, IDENTIFICATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper reports a study that tested empirically the theoretical assumption of that dichotomous difference between central and peripheral elements of a social representation, by comparing it to a model that conceives the symbolic link of elements with representation objects in a continuous way.
More importantly perhaps, it has allowed us to discuss with our students why some things in nature cannot always be easily assigned to predetermined categories (such as dichotomous keys or textbook descriptions) and how using average measurements to describe plants will sometimes fail.
Health insurance in the BRFSS is measured by a dichotomous indicator for whether or not the individual has any kind of health care coverage, be it from private or public sources.
The highest educational level of the household is represented by five dichotomous variables.
That is, prior research reduces the multinomial choice categories to more limited, dichotomous choice categories when measuring insurance coverage.
Because slipping--or not slipping--is a dichotomous pair of events, a mathematical model that reflects that dichotomous situation is especially useful for analyzing walkway-safety situations.
Then, have students use the photos create their own dichotomous key for identifying the animals.
Heim and her colleagues noted that their findings "emphasize the need to revise prevailing dichotomous approaches that differentiate between psychological and biological contributors to CFS.
Theologian Robert Faricy argues convincingly that Teilhard's works help correct dichotomous thinking about humans as apart from nature, an understanding that denigrates other-than-human entities while it fails to appreciate our interrelatedness to and radical dependence on them.
Finkelstein synthesizes these approaches under the aegis of the screen, explaining that the doors and windows planted in the screen-surfaces of surrealist figuration serve as "metaphorical passageways or thresholds between the two dichotomous realms governing surrealist thought--that of dream and mystery and that of the real" (62).