diatoms


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Related to diatoms: diatomaceous earth, Dinoflagellates

diatoms

a series of unicellular algae, microscopic in size, with cell walls containing silica. Members of the family Diatomaceae. Their remains accumulate as geological deposits and are mined. See diatomaceous earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diatoms as potential indicators of anthropogenic disturbance: levels and gradients in the Kurtna study area
But some diatoms are a health hazard to humans and marine animals, including birds and sea lions.
This is clearly demonstrated by the shift from species of the genera Aulacoseira, Cyclotella, Melosira, Stephanodiscus, and Synedra, observed in our study at the site unaffected by damming, to chain-forming diatoms such as Aulacoseira and Melosira, observed at the sites affected by the river flow alteration.
Substrate characteristics affect colonization by the bloom-forming diatom Didymosphenia geminata.
A total of 214 species of benthic diatoms were found [22] and total of 104 species of benthic diatoms were selected to establish a benthic diatoms Index which was more than other indexes of Thailand [20, 28, 40] (Table 2).
If I can tell you how a single diatom--a type of phytoplankton--can respond to a passing cloud, then I can tell you how diatom populations respond to passing clouds.
2002) also reported that microparticulate diet fed to the abalone Haliotis discus discus was superior to diatoms in terms of survival rate.
015 ml), homogenized quantity was placed in a PalmerMaloney counting chamber to survey the basic shape morphologies and condition of diatoms (living or dead).
Diatoms were grouped according to their habitat into plankton and periphyton, and according to their salinity tolerance, to brackish/marine, halophilous and freshwater taxa.
Some types of diatoms known as red tides, for example, can be harmful to underwater ecosystems.
Diatoms (Bacilliariophyta), in particular, are often used to assess environmental conditions.
The diatoms, which appear to thrive in the windier conditions, have increased in the last five years, while dinoflagellates have "almost disappeared", Prof Hays said.