diathesis

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diathesis

 [di-ath´ĕ-sis]
an unusual constitutional susceptibility or predisposition to a particular disease. adj., adj diathet´ic.

di·ath·e·sis

(dī-ath'ĕ-sis),
The constitutional or inborn state disposing to a disease, group of diseases, or metabolic or structural anomaly.
[G. arrangement, condition]

diathesis

(dī-ăth′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. diathe·ses (-sēz′)
1. A hereditary predisposition of the body to a disease, a group of diseases, an allergy, or another disorder.
2. Grammar See voice.

di′a·thet′ic (dī′ə-thĕt′ĭk) adj.

di·ath·e·sis

, pl. diatheses (dī-athĕ-sis, -sēz)
The constitutional or inborn state disposing to a disease, group of diseases, or metabolic or structural anomaly.
[G. arrangement, condition]

diathesis

An inherited predisposition to a disease or condition.

di·ath·e·sis

, pl. diatheses (dī-athĕ-sis, -sēz)
Constitutional or inborn state disposing to disease, group of diseases, or metabolic or structural anomaly.
[G. arrangement, condition]
References in periodicals archive ?
There are 3 retrospective series confirming the safety of ureteroscopy and use of holmium laser energy in patients with uncorrected bleeding diatheses. In the first series, 9 patients (with mean stone size of 9.5 mm, range 4-15 mm) were treated successfully with 1 patient developing postoperative oliguria due to small ureteral clot that resolved spontaneously.
Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with bleeding diatheses. J Urol 1990;144:1347-8.
The initiation of LMWH therapy is typically used in patients already in higher risk morbidity categories such as those with heparin sensitivity issues, those with described clotting diatheses, in higher risk pregnancies (antiphospholipid antibody patients, pre-eclamptic), and patients with histories of hypercoagulable states.
While the majority of excess bleeds are not related to haematological disorders, in certain series, bleeding diatheses accounted for 5 - 20% of underlying causes.
It may well be asked whether making a diagnosis will affect management, as many of the strategies employed in patients with bleeding diatheses are similar to those employed for those who do not suffer from these disorders.
In the past decades, significant advances have been made in understanding coagulation disorders, including thrombophilias and bleeding diatheses. Anticoagulant therapy has advanced just as rapidly, leading to the development of several new classes of drugs that may be used to treat those coagulation disorders.