diastolic pressure


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di·a·stol·ic pres·sure

the intracardiac pressure during or resulting from diastolic relaxation of a cardiac chamber; the lowest arterial blood pressure reached during any given ventricular cycle.

diastolic pressure

n.
The lowest arterial blood pressure reached when the ventricles are relaxed.

di·a·stol·ic pres·sure

(dī'ă-stol'ik presh'ŭr)
The intracardiac pressure during or resulting from diastolic relaxation of a cardiac chamber; the lowest arterial blood pressure reached during any given ventricular cycle.

di·a·stol·ic pres·sure

(dī'ă-stol'ik presh'ŭr)
Intracardiac pressure during or resulting from diastolic relaxation of a cardiac chamber.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas, dP/dt(min) and diastolic pressure remained unaffected; indicating no lusitropic effect.
Our study also revealed that the diastolic pressure difference in the isometric hand-grip exercise test and the cold pressor tests were significantly higher (p value < 0.001) in the patients with OSAS compared to the controls.
Reduced arterial distensibility and compliance contributes to an increase in pulse wave and pulse wave velocity, which increases systolic and pulse pressures and decreases diastolic pressure.
Figure 1 presents the means for systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, and pulse for each of the five phases: 1) baseline, 2) holding animal, 3) baseline, 4) holding animal, and 5) baseline.
This will cause vasoconstriction and result in a rise in the diastolic pressure causing a narrowed pulse pressure.
It is diagnosed in people with a systolic blood pressure (taken when the heart muscle contracts) of 140 mm Hg or greater, or a diastolic pressure (referring to the time between contractions) of 90 or more.
Similarly diastolic pressure increases from the administration of L-NAME were inhibited with carvacrol injections.
Aortic regurgitation results in a low diastolic pressure because minimal blood remains in the aorta to maintain a higher pressure.
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines define high blood pressure as systolic pressure over 140 mmHg or diastolic pressure over 80 mmHg.
Approximately 72 million persons in the United States aged >20 years have high blood pressure (i.e., systolic blood pressure >140 mm Hg or diastolic pressure >90 mm Hg, are taking antihypertensive medication, or have been told on two or more visits to a physician or other health professional that they have high blood pressure) (1).
During periodic leg movements systolic blood pressure rose by an average of 20 points and diastolic pressure increased by 11 points.