diastolic heart failure


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diastolic heart failure

Cardiology Heart failure with preserved left ventricular systolic function–LV ejection fraction of ≥ 50%, no segmental wall motion abnormalities, and no evidence of significant coronary, valvular, infiltrative, pericardial, or pulmonary disease; although DHF is less severe than typical systolic HF in terms of pathophysiologic characteristics, both have severely reduced exercise capacity, neuroendocrine activation and impaired quality of life. See Heart failure. Cf Systolic heart failure.

diastolic heart failure

Heart failure in which systolic function is preserved-the left ventricular ejection fraction is normal. During diastole there is abnormal left ventricle relaxation with increased stiffness of the chamber. Doppler echocardiography is usually necessary to establish the diagnosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in diastolic failure the calcium signalling process is slowed; calcium levels rise to the peak needed for the squeezing action of the heart but don`t then drop quickly enough for an efficient relaxation period - the condition known as diastolic heart failure.
Based on the results, "spironolactone can be considered in patients with diastolic heart failure for improving cardiac function and blood pressure control," Dr.
The study enrolled 150 patients with systolic and diastolic heart failure, presenting to the Cardiology Department of the University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) Medical Center, have signs and symptoms according to European society of cardiology for heart failure (ESC clinical classification for HF).
The effect was seen in dogs with diastolic heart failure within minutes of the drug being administered.
Clinical findings alone are usually inadequate to differentiate systolic heart failure from diastolic heart failure (10-12).
In diastolic heart failure, the left ventricle is stiff (reduced elastic recoil) with impaired relaxation causing a reduction in filling.
Diastolic heart failure, which occurs when the heart is unable to fill up during the relaxation phase, is caused by stiffening of the heart muscle.
Diastolic dysfunction or diastolic heart failure, which often produces no advanced symptoms at all, refers to decline in performance of one or both ventricles of the heart, where they become stiff, and as a result, cannot fill completely and blood can pool in the body's organs, mainly the lungs.
This entails a higher oxygen consumption as well as generation of toxic lipid intermediates which impair endothelial function of coronary microvasculature, both of which cause diastolic heart failure.
Women with diastolic heart failure generally live longer than men with heart failure.
B-type natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler study findings in elderly patients hospitalized for acute diastolic heart failure.