diastole


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Related to diastole: diastolic pressure, atrial diastole

diastole

 [di-as´to-le]
the phase of the cardiac cycle in which the heart relaxes between contractions; specifically, the period when the two ventricles are dilated by the blood flowing into them. See also blood pressure and heart. adj., adj diastol´ic.
electrical diastole that time during which the cell rests; it is represented by phase 4 of the action potential.

di·as·to·le

(dī-as'tō-lē),
Normal postsystolic dilation of the heart cavities, during which they fill with blood; diastole of the atria precedes that of the ventricles; diastole of either chamber alternates rhythmically with systole or contraction of that chamber.
[G. diastolē, dilation]

diastole

(dī-ăs′tə-lē)
n.
1. Physiology The normal rhythmically occurring relaxation and dilatation of the heart chambers, especially the ventricles, during which they fill with blood.
2. The lengthening of a normally short syllable in Greek and Latin verse.

di′as·tol′ic (dī′ə-stŏl′ĭk) adj.

diastole

Cardiology The dilatory–relaxation phase of the cardiac cycle during which the heart's chambers fill with blood

di·as·to·le

(dī-as'tŏ-lē)
Normal postsystolic dilation of the heart cavities, during which they fill with blood; diastole of the atria precedes that of the ventricles; diastole of either chamber alternates rhythmically with systole or contraction of that chamber.
[G. diastolē, dilation]

diastole

The period in the heart cycle when the main pumping chambers (the ventricles) are relaxed and filling with blood from the upper chambers (the atria).

diastole

see HEART, CARDIAC CYCLE.

di·as·to·le

(dī-as'tŏ-lē)
Normal postsystolic dilation of the heart cavities, during which they fill with blood.
[G. diastolē, dilation]
References in periodicals archive ?
Inspection and pericardial eponyms signs from 1864 to 1895 Name Year Description of sign Significance Friedreich 1864 During diastole, there is a Adhesive pericarditis rapid and brief jerking and venous collapse seen best at the anterior jugular vein.
Measured variables are left ventricular longitudinal length in systole (LVLS) and diastole (LVLD).
M-mode echocardiogram obtained from a left-ventricular transverse image at the papillary muscle level, showing augmented left -ventricular diameters at systole and diastole, which resulted in a reduced fractional shortening (14%); E.
As the pressure of the blood pressure gauge continues to drop steadily more blood re-enters the system until even the blood at the lowest pressure (at diastole) is flowing again; this is heard as the fifth Kortokoff sound (which in fact is the absence of sound, since blood is flowing naturally again).
Flow was seen through the defect during both systole and diastole excluding the possibility of tricuspid regurgitation artifact.
To analyze systole and diastole the cardiac cycle is usually divided into seven phases.
The thrombus also prolapses across both the tricuspid and mitral valves during diastole (Figure 1(b)) and measures greater than 10 cm in length.
Caption: Figure 3: (a) and (b): echocardiogram on day of admission showing the apical ballooning typical of TC in systole and diastole, respectively.
M-mode measurement Z-score IVSd 3.3 cm 19 LVPWd 2.2 cm 12.7 LVIDd 3.7 cm -2.7 LVIDs 2.3 cm -2.2 %FS 38% 0.84 %EF 76% LV mass 606 g 8.3 IVSd: interventricular septal thickness in diastole; LVPWd: left ventricular posterior wall thickness in diastole; LVIDd: left ventricular internal dimension in diastole; LVIDs: left ventricular internal dimension in systole; %FS: % fractional shortening; %EF: % ejection fraction.
Then, the left ventricular (LV) interventricular septal thicknesses (IVS), LV internal dimensions (LVID), and posterior wall thicknesses (PW) at the diastole and systole were carefully measured using M-mode at the level of the papillary muscles (Figure 2).