diastema

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diastema

 [di″ah-ste´mah] (pl. diaste´mata) (Gr.)
a space or cleft.

di·a·ste·ma

, pl.

di·a·ste·ma·ta

(dī'ă-stē'mă, -stē'mă-tă),
1. Space between two adjacent teeth in the same dental arch.
2. Fissure or abnormal opening in any part, especially if congenital.
3. Cleft or space between the maxillary lateral incisor and canine teeth, into which the lower canine is received when the jaws are closed; abnormal in humans but normal in dogs and many other animals.
[G. diastēma, an interval]

diastema

(dī′ə-stē′mə)
n. pl. diaste·mata (-mə-tə)
A gap or space between two teeth.

di′a·ste·mat′ic (-stə-măt′ĭk) adj.

di·a·ste·ma

, pl. diastemata (dī'ă-stē'mă, -tă)
1. Fissure or abnormal opening in any part, especially if congenital.
2. Space between two adjacent teeth in the same dental arch.
3. A space between teeth not due to missing teeth.
4. A space between the upper central incisors in humans, or a space between two adjacent teeth in the same dental arch, especially that between the upper lateral incisor and the adjacent canine, into which the lower canine closes in the Carnivora, such as dogs.
Synonym(s): space (2) .
[G. diastēma, an interval]

diastema

a gap in the teeth along the jawbone. In herbivores the diastema separates the incisors from the premolars resulting in an elongation of the jaw and aiding in feeding.

di·a·ste·ma

, pl. diastemata (dī'ă-stē'mă, -tă)
1. [TA] Space between two adjacent teeth in the same dental arch.
See also: gap
2. Cleft or space between the maxillary lateral incisor and canine teeth, into which the lower canine is received when the jaws are closed; abnormal in humans.
[G. diastēma, an interval]
References in periodicals archive ?
The emergence of these developments is contemporaneous with the rise of diastematic notation.
A manuscript without shelfmark housed at the Benedictine convent of Santa Cruz de la Seros in Jaca, Spain, is the only antiphoner in diastematic Aquitanian neumes from twelfth-century Aragon and the only known manuscript from Santa Cruz de la Seros to survive.
Since the notation is diastematic with dry-point or colored lines indicating the pitches F, c, and occasionally b[flat], its transcription presents few difficulties.