diastase

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diastase

 [di´ah-stās]
a combination of enzymes produced during germination of seeds, and contained in malt; it converts starch into maltose and then into glucose.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·a·stase

(dī'a-stās),
A mixture, obtained from malt and containing amylolytic enzymes (principally α- and β-amylases), that converts starch into dextrin and maltose; used to make soluble starches, to aid in digestion of starches in certain types of dyspepsia, and to digest glycogen in histologic sections.
[Fr., fr. G. diastasis, separation, fr. dia, apart + histēmi, to make to stand]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

diastase

(dī′ə-stās′, -stāz′)
n.
An amylase or a mixture of amylases that is found in milk and that converts starch to dextrin and maltose.

di′a·sta′sic (-stā′sĭk, -zĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

di·a·stase

(dī'a-stǎs)
A mixture, obtained from malt and containing amylolytic enzymes (principally α- and β-amylases), which converts starch into dextrin and maltose; used to make soluble starches, to aid in digestion of starches in certain types of dyspepsia, and to digest glycogen in histologic sections.
[Fr., fr. G. diastasis, separation, fr. dia, apart + histēmi, to make to stand]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

diastase

An ENZYME capable of breaking down starch. An amylase.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

diastase

an enzyme mixture common in seeds such as barley, that is responsible for starch hydrolysis. The mixture contains amylases for conversion of starch to MALTOSE (sometimes via DEXTRIN) and MALTASE for conversion of maltose to glucose.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005