diaschisis


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di·as·chi·sis

(dī-as'ki-sis),
A sudden inhibition of function produced by an acute focal disturbance in a portion of the brain at a distance from the original site of injury, but anatomically connected with it through fiber tracts.
[G. a splitting]

di·as·chi·sis

(dī-as'ki-sis)
A sudden inhibition of function produced by an acute focal disturbance in a portion of the brain at a distance from the original seat of injury, but anatomically connected with it through fiber tracts.
[G. a splitting]
References in periodicals archive ?
It also is possible that vision impairment may result in a phenomenon called diaschisis, which is defined as a change or loss of function in parts of the brain that might be far apart but are connected by neurons.
Clinical research shows how patients with Chiari I have subjective complaints in a wide range of neuropsychological functions (attention, executive functions, working memory) that could be involved in the pathogenesis and could respond to mechanisms of crossed cerebellar diaschisis (Baillieux, et al., 2010; Starowicz-Filip, Milczarek, Kwiatkowski, & Betkowska-Korpala, 2013).
Keywords: Crossed cerebellar diaschisis, magnetic resonance imaging, cerebellar atrophy
[2] The secondary injury process (includes excessive synthesis of nitric oxide and oxidative stress, microglia activation, local inflammation, disturbances of microcirculation, blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed mechanism of cell death) leads in a vicious circle to disastrous consequences like neuronal necrosis, neuronal apoptosis, scare and/ or cyst/ hygroma formation, demyelination, disruption of morphofunctional uncoupling such as diaschisis. [3]
The immediate response to spinal cord injury is known as diaschisis or spinal shock (Hung 2015).
This phenomenon may be explained by the concept of diaschisis, which states that injury to one part of an interconnected neural network can affect other, separate parts of that network.
More distant abnormalities are also described, such as restricted diffusion affecting the splenium [47], unilateral or bilateral increased signal on T2 FLAIR imaging affecting the ipsilateral posterior thalamus/pulvinar region, or the contralateral cerebellum representing cerebellar diaschisis [48, 49] (Figure 5).
Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is a decrease of regional blood flow and glucose metabolism in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the affected brain hemisphere as a common consequence of a supratentorial cerebral malfunction [1-3].
Newer and more powerful techniques such as Positron and Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography are functional imaging procedures that allow the evaluation of cerebral perfusion and metabolism and have provided insights into stroke pathophysiology and discovery of misery perfusion syndrome, diaschisis, and luxury perfusion [4].
MRI brain showed cerebellar atrophy more prominent in anterior vermis with asymmetric white matter volume loss (more in the left side) resulting in crossed cerebellar diaschisis [Figure 2].
Witte, "Pharmacological reduction of electrophysiological diaschisis after photothrombotic ischemia in rat neocortex," European Journal of Pharmacology, vol.
Focal areas of crossed cerebellar diaschisis or ipsilateral thalamic lesions can be seen [55].