diary


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diary

A personal record kept by a patient or caregiver of important outpatient observations, e.g., blood pressures; blood glucose levels; caloric intake; or the frequency of certain symptoms, such as bowel movements, crying spells, headaches, palpitations, or urination.
References in periodicals archive ?
The value of Kellners book lies in its meticulous study and comparison of three important German diary novels.
Perhaps Lounsberry meant this paragraph to create suspense for her next book, but it left me puzzled and searching the thirteenth diary for information about what she calls Woolf's "dispute with her women supporters" (226).
I enjoyed the photos of Joan as a girl and young woman, along with funny drawings she made in her diary and newspaper clippings about important events that she pasted in her diary.
Almost a quarter felt the only private part of their lives was their diary and two thirds said writing a daily journal away from prying eyes was therapeutic.
Shulman, who visited Ghana many times in the late 70s and early 80s, says he had the Nkrumah diary in his possession for more than 20 years before a legal tug of war began between him and Vincent Mbirika, a Kenyan expatriate who lives in New York.
The diary includes features from your favourite Mirror Racing writers, plus all the essential information to keep one step ahead.
The basic daily headache diary was well accepted by patients and was well accepted by physicians," Dr.
An earlier, pilot study with 76 patients demonstrated the paper-based diary improved diagnostic sensitivity from 75% to 92% and specificity from 58% to 87% when combined with a clinical interview and examination (Cephalalgia 2008;28:1023-30).
The practice of writing a diary for intensive care patients was first noted in Denmark in the 1980s and was soon followed up in Sweden and Norway (Bergbom et al.
Lejeune's investment is not just in the diaries of extraordinary individuals; be is also wonderfully attentive to the ways that private citizens affect culture; as he works to characterize particular moments in the history of the diary, though, be does note curious representatives, such as Marc-Antoine Jullien, who takes the early nineteenth-century French approach of using the diary as a spur to more efficient time-management to an extraordinary degree by promoting a revolution in education in which boys' governors would keep a detailed record of the children's activities that the boys would then be made to read.
READING somebody else's diary behind their back used to be considered the ultimate display of bad form.
A hospital trust has apologised to hundreds of new and expectant mothers after a midwife lost a diary containing their names and addresses.