diaphysis

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diaphysis

 [di-af´ĭ-sis] (pl. diaph´yses) (Gr.)
1. the portion of a long bone between the ends or extremities, which is usually articular, and wider than the shaft; it consists of a tube of compact bone, enclosing the medullary cavity. Called also shaft.
2. the portion of a bone formed from a primary center of ossification. See illustration.
Diaphysis. From Dorland's, 2000.

di·aph·y·sis

, pl.

di·aph·y·ses

(dī-af'i-sis, -sēz), [TA]
An elongated rodlike structure, as the part of a long bone between the epiphysial extremities. The shaft of a long bone, as distinguished from the epiphyses, or extremities, and apophyses, or outgrowths.
Synonym(s): shaft [TA]
[G. a growing between]

diaphysis

/di·aph·y·sis/ (di-af´ĭ-sis) pl. diaph´yses   [Gr.]
1. the shaft of a long bone, between the epiphyses.
2. the portion of a long bone formed from a primary center of ossification.

diaphysis

(dī-ăf′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. diaphy·ses (-sēz′) Anatomy
The shaft of a long bone.

di′a·phys′i·al (dī′ə-fĭz′ē-əl), di·aph′y·se′al (dī-ăf′ĭ-sē′əl, dī′ə-fĭz′ē-əl) adj.

diaphysis

[dī·af′isis]
Etymology: Gk, dia + phyein, to grow
the shaft of a long bone, consisting of a tube of compact bone enclosing the medullary cavity.

shaft

(shaft) [TA]
An elongated rodlike structure, as the part of a long bone between the epiphysial extremities.
Synonym(s): diaphysis [TA] .
[A.S. sceaft]

diaphysis

The shaft of a long bone. Distinguish from EPIPHYSIS, the growth zone at the ends of a long bone.

diaphysis

the shaft of a long bone. Compare EPIPHYSIS.

diaphysis

shaft of a long bone

shaft

(shaft) [TA]
An elongated rodlike structure.
Synonym(s): diaphysis [TA] .
[A.S. sceaft]

diaphysis (diaf´isis),

n the shaft of a long bone.

diaphysis

pl. diaphyses.
1. the portion of a long bone between the ends or extremities, which are usually articular, and wider than the shaft; it consists of a tube of compact bone, enclosing the medullary cavity. Called also shaft.
2. the portion of a bone formed from a primary center of ossification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radiographically, endosteal and periosteal thickening of the diaphyses of long bones (Figs.
The shape of long bone diaphyses is influenced by bending (shear) and torsional loads (Ruff 1987), and the thickness of diaphyseal cortex in the axial plane forms a structure that is virtually impervious to fracture by a compressive load under normal circumstances (Cowin 1995).
The diaphyses of major long bones usually are affected.
Compression plate fixation of acute fractures of the diaphyses of radius and ulna.
Under histologic examination of PNBF free of tumor, a blue cement line was frequently seen on Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, separating the cortex from the periosteum in the femoral diaphyses, on both axial and coronal sections of the bone.
1) The diaphyses of the femur, tibia, and humerus are also common sites of primary tumor involvement.