diaphragm muscle


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diaphragm muscle

Origin: internal surfaces of lower six ribs, xiphoid process, vertebral bodies L1-L3. Insertion: central tendon (of diaphragm). Nerve: phrenic, lower six intercostals. Action: inflates lungs
See also: muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Diaphragm muscle thinning, inspiratory muscles' strength, inspiratory pressure, ultrasound
As the phrenic nerve to the diaphragm muscles fails, patients lose the ability to breathe without ventilator support.
But no article has elaborated how to deal with the invaded and incomplete diaphragm muscle if the patient has a significant defect located in the diaphragm.
They discovered that both the intravascular and intramuscular delivery approaches led to full-length, intact dysferlin gene expression in the leg and diaphragm muscle cells of the mice.
Management is usually by positive pressure ventilation and, less often, by activation of the diaphragm muscle through phrenic nerve stimulation.
As predicted, microscopic examination of diaphragm muscle tissue in agrin mutant mice showed a complete loss of dense receptor clusters that would mark a mature synapse, meaning that without the agrin "cement," synapse dispersing activity had swept away the clusters.
Phrenic nerve stimulation using magnetic or transcutaneous stimulation has previously been used to directly stimulate the diaphragm muscle (43) and may be useful in assessing whether force deficits indicative of muscle damage are present following an intense bout of ITL.
Phrenic nerve and diaphragmatic stimulation occur when the electrical output from a device inadvertently activates the diaphragm muscle (either directly or via the phrenic nerve), causing patients to hiccup with the delivery of the pacing stimuli.
sup][25] In rats, after endotoxin injection, gene expression and production of TNF-a are elevated in the diaphragm tissue, and anti-TNF-a antibody preinjection can prevent the deterioration of the diaphragm muscle contractile properties.
Doctors then used a synthetic patch inserted into her chest as she did not have a diaphragm muscle.
Sports scientists took two different types of mouse muscle - a leg muscle called extensor digitorum longus, as well as diaphragm muscle - and tested how they performed when dosed with 70 micromolars of caffeine - equivalent to "a couple of espressos," said first author Jason Tallis, a muscle physiologist at Coventry University in England.