diaphoresis


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sweating

 [swet´ing]
the excretion of moisture through the pores of the skin; called also perspiration and diaphoresis.

pers·pi·ra·tion

(pers'pi-rā'shŭn),
1. The excretion of fluid by the sweat glands of the skin.
See also: sweat.
See also: sweat (1). Synonym(s): diaphoresis, sudation, sweating
2. All fluid loss through normal skin, whether by sweat gland secretion or by diffusion through other skin structures.
See also: sweat (1).
3. The hypotonic fluid excreted by the sweat glands; it consists of water containing sodium chloride and phosphate, urea, ammonia, ethereal sulfates, creatinine, fats, and other waste products; the average daily quantity is estimated at about 1500 g.
See also: sweat (1). Synonym(s): sudor
[L. per-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe everywhere]

diaphoresis

(dī′ə-fə-rē′sĭs, dī-ăf′ə-)
n.
Perspiration, especially when copious and medically induced.

diaphoresis

Medtalk Sweat, ↑ sweat

pers·pi·ra·tion

(pĕrs'pir-ā'shŭn)
1. The excretion of fluid by the sweat glands of the skin.
Synonym(s): diaphoresis, sudation, sweating.
2. All fluid loss through normal skin, whether by sweat gland secretion or by diffusion through other skin structures.
3. The fluid excreted by the sweat glands; it consists of water containing sodium chloride and phosphate, urea, ammonia, ethereal sulfates, creatinine, fats, and other waste products; the average daily quantity is estimated at about 1500 g.
Synonym(s): sudor.
See also: sweat (2) , sweat (1)
[L. per-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe everywhere]

diaphoresis

Heavy perspiration, especially when medically induced.

pers·pi·ra·tion

(pĕrs'pir-ā'shŭn)
1. The excretion of fluid by the sweat glands of the skin.
Synonym(s): diaphoresis, sudation, sweating.
2. All fluid loss through normal skin, whether by sweat gland secretion or by diffusion through other skin structures.
Synonym(s): sudor.
See also: sweat (2) , sweat (1)
[L. per-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe everywhere]
References in periodicals archive ?
Once an episode of PSH occurs, non-pharmacologic management should include prevention and treatment of dehydration from diaphoresis and hyperthermia through use of external cooling measures (Rabinstein & Benarroch, 2008).
Briefly, the patient had decreased level of consciousness, intense muscle rigidity, fever, drooling, diaphoresis, urinary incontinence, sweating, and increased blood pressure.
This case suggests that any young patient who presents with syncope and unexplainable diaphoresis, aortic stenosis would be a differential.
Other symptoms include flushing, palpitations, anxiety/panic attacks, diaphoresis and headache, often transient.
The diagnostic criteria for neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) provided in the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV)[21 specify that the individual must exhibit severe muscle rigidity and elevated temperature associated with the use of antipsychotic medication and have at least two of the following associated symptoms: (a) diaphoresis, (b) dysphagia, (c) tremor, (d) incontinence, (e) changes in level of consciousness ranging from confusion to coma, (f) mutism, (g) tachycardia, (h) elevated or labile blood pressure, (i) leukocytosis, or (j) laboratory evidence of muscle injury (e.g., elevated CPK).
Patients present with severe pain in the abdominal area, diaphoresis, and vomiting.
Thus, a 58-year-old mother of two (whose own mother had had breast cancer), who was having drenching night sweats and intermittent fever, became a 58-year-old gravida 2, para 2 female with FHx of maternal mammary metaplasia who was having severe nocturnal diaphoresis accompanied by febrile episodes.
The response results in the following: profuse sweating (diaphoresis), accelerated heart rate, vasoconstriction of blood vessels, increased blood pressure, diversion of blood from non-essential areas in order to increase blood perfusion to the brain and muscles of the arms and legs, skin pallor, and decreased function of the digestive system, which may result in vomiting and abdominal cramps.
The patient reported no headaches, palpitations, or diaphoresis.
Other commonly reported symptoms are chest pain, palpitations, fever, hyperthermia (fever), nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis (sweating), abdominal pain, dys- pnea (shortness of breath), headache and seizures.
At arrival he was alert with no diaphoresis and denied having chest pain or chest tightness.
Signs and symptoms include high fever, diaphoresis, chills, headaches, and anorexia.