diapause


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Related to diapause: aestivation

di·a·pause

(dī'ă-pawz),
A period of biologic quiescence or dormancy with decreased metabolism; an interval in which development is arrested or greatly slowed.
[dia- + G. pausis, pause]

diapause

/di·a·pause/ (-pawz) a state of inactivity and arrested development accompanied by greatly decreased metabolism, as in many eggs, insect pupae, and plant seeds; it is a mechanism for surviving adverse winter conditions.

diapause

(dī′ə-pôz′)
n. Zoology
A period during which growth or development is suspended and physiological activity is diminished, as in certain insects in response to adverse environmental conditions.

di·a·pause

(dī'ă-pawz)
A period of biologic quiescence or dormancy with decreased metabolism; an interval in which development is arrested or greatly slowed.
[dia- + G. pausis, pause]

diapause

a period of arrested growth and development in insects which is under the control of the endocrine system. Diapause is an adaptation to avoid adverse conditions, but does not automatically end with the termination of the adverse conditions as it is genetically determined. However, diapause can be ‘broken’ by an appropriate environmental change, or artificially by temperature shocks or chemical stimulation.

diapause

a state of inactivity and arrested development accompanied by greatly reduced metabolism, as in many eggs, insect pupae and plant seeds. It is a mechanism for surviving adverse weather conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
rufimanus adults or their life duration, their death in places of diapause were followed up.
The results, published in Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata (August 2013) showed that "diapausers" spent more time resting and less time feeding, had more body fat, and survived three times longer than insects that never entered diapause.
The proportion of reproductively immature flies increased in spring or early summer at all locations, a period during which the European literature suggests that a reproductive diapause may occur.
Diapause is critical to the survival of the species, as these mosquitoes hold onto their immature eggs through the winter and wait until spring to develop them to maturity and deposit them.
Taking into account these results and those from a previous study showing that eggs flooded at low temperatures after being stored at winter temperatures do not hatch (Campos & Sy, 2006), we suggest that Ochlerotatus albifasciatus eggs are able to hatch during winter only if they have finished the diapause period and have at least experimented, a short drought period at warm temperature.
In contrast, individuals which migrate to Monteverde are univoltine and enter reproductive diapause during the non-breeding season (Stevenson and Haber 1996).
Institutions that keep one male per female group often cannot determine sires when males are exchanged due to the reproductive adaptation of embryonic diapause.
Typically, resident populations feed only when plants are adding new growth, and enter diapause (hibernation) the rest of the year.
3) Subgroup-B populations presented two clutches and a long imaginal diapause after the first vitellogenesis.