terrapin

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Related to diamondback terrapins: Malaclemys terrapin

terrapin

see turtle.
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Banning all harvesting is the right thing to do to ensure future generations can continue to enjoy seeing diamondback terrapins in the wild.
All 5 diamondback terrapins found in this study were associated with marsh habitat: 1 terrapin in a DCP in a marsh creek of the Cape Fear River and 4 juvenile terrapins in a DCP in Topsail Sound, where the ICW traverses marsh habitat.
Viewing platforms offer opportunities for viewing eagles and other sensitive species, a pollinator garden, a bluebird box trail that runs on all six golf courses, and Diamondback Terrapin hatcheries are evidence of residents' passion for local wildlife.
This study documented Texas diamondback terrapins are able to tolerate hypersaline conditions in their southernmost known range, the Nueces Estuary.
Nesting ecology and predation of diamondback terrapins, Malaclemys terrapin, at Gateway National Recreation Area, New York.
The diamondback terrapin, Malaclerays terrapin, is associated with coastal wetlands that coincide with the highly developed eastern portions of the state.
The Alabama population of diamondback terrapins exists in isolated remnant aggregations, and the largest one, identified to-date, inhabits Cedar Point Marsh, which has been extensively studied starting in 2004 (Coleman, 2011).
The parade of slow-moving diamondback terrapins began about 6:45 a.
Diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin), and others (Altherr & Freyer, 2000; Behler, 1997; Williams, 1999).
A similar premise has been used to effectively exclude diamondback terrapins, Malaclemys terrapin, from crab pots (Guillory and Prejean, 1998).
Emeric apparently returned to California from a trip to the East Coast with five dozen small diamondback terrapins.
11:45 SIZE-CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF NORTHERN DIAMONDBACK TERRAPINS (MALACLEMYS TERRAPIN TERRAPIN) WITHIN A NORTH EAST ATLANTIC SALT MARSH ESTUARY