dialect

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Related to dialectally: Dialectical reasoning

dialect

Sociology A sublanguage system spoken in a region or by a particular group of people. See Ebonics. Cf Jargon, Slang.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

di·a·lect

(dī'ă-lekt)
The aggregate of generally local shifts in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary from a perceived less localized standard.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The point here is that for revolutionary educative strategizing, it is not a choice between a focus on class or culture, it is seeing them as dialectally integrated in historical materiality.
Such updating of archaic forms or removal of dialectally striking forms has been noted in other texts that Caxton claims to have revised by updating the language, such as Trevisa's English Polychronicon.
"Code-Switching: Tools of Language and Culture Transform the Dialectally Diverse Classroom." Language Arts 81, no.
The case-study of the madman Pierre is presented dialectally by means of variable focalization.
All subjects were native speakers of Czech; some of the subjects were unable to name their dialect, but were aware that they spoke 'somewhat dialectally'.
While not used in standard Italian, deferential voi was widespread in the first half of the 20th century and still occurs dialectally. Finally, standard Brazilian Portuguese, the variety used in the Silveira translation, distinguishes between informal voce (sing.) / voces (pl.) and formal o senhor (masc.
historical construction of philosophy that is simultaneously (dialectally) a philosophical reconstruction of history, one in which philosophy's ideational elements are expressed as changing meanings within historical images that themselves are discontinuous--such a project is not best discussed in generalities.
The singing subjects came from several different localities within the Western Hemisphere, and all of the judges were from New England, the latter observation suggesting that the differences between the listening groups were not dialectally generated.
Catherine Miller examines the language of migrants from the dialectally diverse Upper Egypt (Sohag-Gena area) in Cairo.
Thus when scientific and mathematical thought serve music, or any human creative activity, it should amalgamate dialectally with intuition.