dialect

(redirected from dialectally)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to dialectally: Dialectical reasoning

dialect

[dī′əlekt]
a variation of spoken language different from other forms of the same language in pronunciation, syntax, and word meanings. A particular dialect is usually shared by members of an ethnic group, socioeconomic group, or people living together in a geographic area.

dialect

Sociology A sublanguage system spoken in a region or by a particular group of people. See Ebonics. Cf Jargon, Slang.

di·a·lect

(dī'ă-lekt)
The aggregate of generally local shifts in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary from a perceived less localized standard.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would appear, therefore that the T-unit presents the clinician with a more culturally fair, dialectally nonbiased assessment tool with which to base objective clinical decisions regarding syntactic performance.
Table 2 below classifies dialectally the texts containing twen(e).
The scene also allowed for the story to enter the discourse on the armed struggle, and to dialectally explore the terrorists' reasons for what they had done.
In the next essay, the first in the volume's third section, Ryan Perry cites the mobility of the noble household as an ingenious explanation for the dialectally mixed contents of the Clopton manuscript.
In doing so, I assess whether diffusion models in the literature to date adequately account for the outcomes of diffusion, as demonstrated in the casual speech of eighteen adolescents from three dialectally distinct parts of the Fens.
To date, most attempts to create more culture-fair language tests have utilized one of two approaches: (a) renorming existing tests on various ethnic minorities and (b) adjusting the scores for dialectally sensitive items on standardized tests for speakers of a nonstandard-English dialect (Leonard & Weiss, 1994).
On page 47, Katamba is more forthcoming about the form children, explaining it historically and dialectally but, regrettably, inaccurately.
For the past verb the situation is dialectally complicated, even if Modern Western Aramaic is only spoken in three villages.
Likewise, the Serbian lexeme jyHAK (junak), which nowadays means 'hero', formerly referred to a young man (and is still used dialectally in that meaning), and in Russian, Morodey (molodec) 'young man' has added the meaning 'hero'.
33) These western forms, which have been localized to the southwest Midlands, (34) are especially prominent at the beginning of the manuscript, and they are dialectally irreconcilable with both the Type III and the Type IV forms.
some of them could not name their specific dialect--they just knew they were speaking a little dialectally.
Old English biblical texts as historical data can be used for various purposes: to trace historical development of English, to compare lexical choice dialectally and diachronically, to see the difference between glosses and free translation, etc.