diagnostic

(redirected from diagnostic hypotheses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

di·ag·nos·tic

(dī'ag-nos'tik),
1. Relating to or aiding in diagnosis.
2. Establishing or confirming a diagnosis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

diagnostic

(dī′əg-nŏs′tĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or used in a diagnosis.
2. Serving to identify a particular disease; characteristic.
n.
1. often diagnostics(used with a sing. verb) The art or practice of medical diagnosis.
2. A symptom or a distinguishing feature serving as supporting evidence in a diagnosis.
3. An instrument or technique used in medical diagnosis.

di′ag·nos′ti·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

di·ag·nos·tic

(dī-ăg-nos'tik)
1. Relating to or aiding in diagnosis.
2. Establishing or confirming a diagnosis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

diagnostic

Pertaining to DIAGNOSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Diagnostic

The art or act of identifying a disease from its signs and symptoms.
Mentioned in: Kinesiology, Applied
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·ag·nos·tic

(dī-ăg-nos'tik)
1. Relating to or aiding in diagnosis.
2. Establishing or confirming a diagnosis.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Major recent diagnostic hypotheses (DH), published since 2000, alternatives to syphilis, attributed to Nietzsche as a causal explanation for his collapse suffered in Turin.
This exercise provides, therefore, an opportunity for students to identify some of the ways in which their assumptions and biases affect their diagnostic hypotheses.
For example, there is the multiscale approach model, which advocates that pathologists identify suspicious regions at low magnification and then use the data at higher magnifications to confirm or refute the diagnostic hypotheses originally formed.
These terms are preferable to predictive value, particularly negative predictive value, in that they make it easier to appreciate how sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio data change the initial probabilities of particular diagnostic hypotheses. The effects of changing cutoff points, use of odds and likelihood ratios, combination testing, and in particular, the concept of posttest probabilities crossing "thresholds" and thereby confirming or excluding diagnostic hypotheses are all presented in lucid clinically relevant language.
Seemingly irrelevant or contradictory parts of the patient's story often make sense when the patient's competing diagnostic hypotheses are made explicit in this fashion.
It allows the user to generate diagnostic hypotheses based on clinical findings using one or two methods.

Full browser ?