dieresis

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so·lu·tion of con·ti·nu·i·ty

division of bones or soft parts that are normally continuous, as by a fracture, a laceration, or an incision.
Synonym(s): dieresis

dieresis

/di·er·e·sis/ (di-er´ah-sis)
1. the division or separation of parts normally united.
2. the surgical separation of parts.

dieresis

[dī·er′əsis]
separation of a structure's parts by surgery or other means.

so·lu·tion of con·ti·nu·i·ty

(sŏ-lū'shŭn kon'ti-nū'i-tē)
Division of bones or soft parts that are normally continuous, as by a fracture, a laceration, or an incision.
Synonym(s): dieresis.

dieresis

1. the division or separation of parts normally united.
2. the surgical separation of parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of two letters it is necessary to use a base character followed by a combining macron below and then a combining diaeresis.
For Dinka and Nuer, it is necessary to be able to display certain base characters with U+0331 COMBINING MACRON BELOW and U+0308 COMBINING DIAERESIS.
For Dinka and Nuer, somewhat acceptable results are achieved for lowercase open-e and open-o when using a combining diaeresis.
With the mistake of the initial diaeresis corrected, the Stranger pursues the definition of the statesman by a new method, one that better reflects the complex human character which is the object of the statesman's concern.
On the one hand, in the initial diaeresis the Stranger assigns political science to the gnostic arts, those which are "stripped of actions and furnish only cognition," rather than to the practical (258d5-6).
Were young Socrates to recognize this complexity he would gain insight into the inadequacy of a method such as diaeresis.
57) In keeping with such an intention, Cicero further emphasized the cadence by reducing the fifth foot diaeresis, and disallowing elision or punctuation within the fifth and sixth foot.
As mentioned above, the role of mathematical ideas in Timaeus, of diaeresis in the late dialogues, and of geometry in the curriculum of the Academy, as well as Aristotle's testimony, make this assumption prima facie plausible.
First, a point of terminology: following common practice I use the terms diaeresis (dieresi) and dialefe to stand for all syllable divisions between adjacent vowels, respectively within and across word boundaries; conversely I use their opposites, synaeresis (sineresi) and sinalefe ('synaloepha' exists in English, but is not much used), to stand for all cases where two or more adjacent vowels are counted as a single syllable.
for sinalefe; the standard diaeresis mark (a, e, i, o, u), when it is used by Petrocchi, and the symbol | where there is a diaeresis not marked in his edition; | is also used, for the sake of maximum clarity, to mark the syllable division produced by a semiconsonantal intervocalic i, though this would not usually be considered a case of diaeresis or dialefe.
208); six with the first element before a strong caesura in the third foot and the second element after the bucolic diaeresis (= type 1a; cf.
The galliambic meter is scanned as U U U - | UU - - || U U - U | U U - , with a diaeresis after the second foot.