diachronic

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Related to diachrony: synchrony and diachrony

di·a·chron·ic

(dī'ă-kron'ik),
Systematically observed over time in the same subjects throughout as opposed to synchronic or cross-sectional; the inferences are equivalent only where there is strict stability of all elements.
[dia- + G. chronos, time]

di·a·chron·ic

(dī-ă-kron'ik)
Systematically observed over time in the same subjects throughout as opposed to synchronic or cross-sectional.
[dia- + G. chronos, time]
References in periodicals archive ?
Kitahara (1997: 5) presents Merge in a way that, to our knowledge, combines both PSR and the diachrony of Merge:
As is generally accepted in the field of historical linguistics, variation in the synchrony represents change in the diachrony.
Re(e)volving complexity: Adding intonation, Syntactic complexity: Diachrony, acquisition, neuro-cognition, evolution, ed.
The incantatory language of Lou's reverie, saturated with Biblical diction and apocalyptic fervor, erupts into narrative chronos, into the apparent syntactic inevitability of the Shropshire world, disturbing everyday temporal sense and evoking diachrony, the rise and fall of the lapse of time itself through the ages.
In this sense, the phonemic inventory is partly shaped by diachrony and sociolinguistic forces (such as literacy and language contact).
6) The paradigm's historicity is an intersection of diachrony and synchrony.
They write: "Besides the dialogue within the discipline and between disciplines, the elaboration of the methodology of studying translation and translating points also to the need for a dialogue between diachrony and synchrony.
The source of pressure is narrative, in that if any Oriental detail can be shown to move, or to develop, diachrony is introduced into the system.
Done, finished, and started as reflexes of the Scottish transitive be perfect in North America: their synchrony, diachrony, and current marginalisation'.
Markedness in Synchrony and Diachrony, Berlin, Alemania, Mouton de Gruyter, pp.
Although there are, of course, many ways to embody both synchrony and diachrony in language, each has its characteristic syntax.
This interchangeability of the natural and the artificial is legible in the diachrony of a process whose eskhaton can be described the following way: "Economic history, whose entire previous development centered around the opposition between city and country, has now progressed to the point of nullifying both.