dextrocardia


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dextrocardia

 [dek″stro-kahr´de-ah]
location of the heart in the right side of the thorax, the apex pointing to the right. See illustration.
Dextrocardia. From Dorland's, 2000.
mirror-image dextrocardia location of the heart in the right side of the chest, the atria being transposed and the right ventricle lying anteriorly and to the left of the left ventricle.

dex·tro·car·di·a

(deks'trō-kar'dē-ă),
Displacement of the heart to the right, either as dextroposition, with simple displacement to the right, or as cardiac heterotaxia, with complete transposition of the right and left chambers, resulting in a heart that is the mirror image of a normal heart.
Synonym(s): dexiocardia
[dextro- + G. kardia, heart]

dextrocardia

/dex·tro·car·dia/ (-kahr´de-ah) location of the heart in the right side of the thorax, the apex pointing to the right.
isolated dextrocardia  mirror-image transposition of the heart without accompanying alteration of the abdominal viscera.
mirror-image dextrocardia  location of the heart in the right side of the chest, the atria being transposed and the right ventricle lying anteriorly and left of the left ventricle.

dextrocardia

[-kär′dē·ə]
the location of the heart in the right hemithorax, either as a result of displacement by disease or as a congenital defect.

dextrocardia

A heart misplaced in the right chest, with the apex of the heart pointing right; the cardiac function is normal if there is concomitant situs inversus of the abdominal organs–mirror-image dextrocardia; if the dextrocardia is due to immotile cilia, sinusitis and bronchiectasis–Kartagener syndrome may also be present EKG Mirror-image electrical activity with P, QRS, and T waves in leads I, aVR, aVL that are the reverse of the normal; the right activity resembles that normally seen in the left side of the chest; if the abdominal organs are not reversed, dextrocardia may be associated with ventricular inversion, single-chamber ventricle, pulmonary valve stenosis and anomalies of venous return. See Kartagener's syndrome. Cf Dextroposition of the heart.

dex·tro·car·di·a

(deks'trō-kahr'dē-ă)
Displacement of the heart to the right, either as dextroposition, with simple displacement to the right, or as cardiac heterotaxia, with complete transposition of the right and left chambers, resulting in a heart that is the mirror image of a normal heart.
[dextro- + G. kardia, heart]

dextrocardia

The congenital anomaly in which the apex of the heart points to the right instead of the left. Dextrocardia is often associated with a similar mirror-image reversal of the abdominal organs.

dextrocardia

location of the heart in the right side of the thorax, the apex pointing to the right.

mirror-image dextrocardia
location of the heart in the right side of the chest, the atria being transposed and the right ventricle lying anteriorly and to the left of the left ventricle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coronary angioplasty in a patient with dextrocardia.
In conditions when aorta is in the right side position as situs inversus and dextrocardia, most important modifications of angiography and PCI procedures are counterclockwise rotation of Judkins catheter and mirror image angiographic angles.
As unlike normally positioned hearts, right precordial pain may represent in patients with situs inversus and dextrocardia.
Few cases with situs inversus and dextrocardia were reported up to date in literature previously (7, 8).
Coronary angiography and coronary interventional procedures have been well described in cases of dextrocardia and situs inversus (5-8).
Dextroversion refers to cases of dextrocardia with normally related atria (atrial situs solitus).
In a Mayo Clinic series between 1960 and 1970, 60 cases of dextrocardia were studied with angiography.
Systematization and clinical study of dextroversion, mirror-image dextrocardia, and laevoversion.
Right bundle branch block with dextrocardia due to eventration of the left hemi-diaphragm.
In this study, dextrocardia was defined as the location of the heart in the right hemithorax with the apex pointing to the right.
One case, referred for fetal echocardiography after a preliminary diagnosis of dextrocardia on obstetric ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging examination, had normal cardiac anatomy and position.
3A-B) and one case had right atrial isomerism and dextrocardia (Fig.