dextrin

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dextrin

 [dek´strin]
any of a range of glucose polymers of varying sizes formed during the hydrolysis of starch.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dex·trin

(deks'trin),
A mixture of oligo(α-1,4-d-glucose) molecules formed during the enzymic or acid hydrolysis of starch, amylopectin, or glycogen; on further hydrolysis they are converted into d-glucose. Dextrins are of much lower molecular weight than dextrans, hence not suitable as plasma expanders; dextrin (usually white dextrin) is used in pharmaceutical preparations.
Synonym(s): starch gum
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dextrin

(dĕk′strĭn) also

dextrine

(dĕk′strĭn, -strēn′)
n.
Any of various soluble polysaccharides obtained from starch by the application of heat or acids and used mainly as adhesives and thickening agents.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dex·trin

(deks'trin)
A mixture of oligo(α-1,4-d-glucose) molecules formed during the enzymic or acid hydrolysis of starch, amylopectin, or glycogen; on further hydrolysis they are converted into d-glucose. Dextrins are of much lower molecular weight than dextrans, hence not suitable as plasma expanders; used in pharmaceutical preparations.
Synonym(s): starch gum.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Dextrinclick for a larger image
Fig. 130 Dextrin . The hydrolysis of insoluble starch to soluble glucose.

dextrin

a polysaccharide carbohydrate that may form an intermediate step in the hydrolysis of insoluble starch to soluble glucose, ready for CELL RESPIRATION, TRANSLOCATION or further synthesis.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
So if you are going to make something with 10% alcohol, you'll have a lot of non-fermented sugars, dextrines, in the beer.