dextran


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Related to dextran: dextrin, dextran 70, dextran sulfate

dextran

 [dek´stran]
a water-soluble polysaccharide of glucose produced by the action of Leuconostoc mesenteroides on sucrose; used as an artificial plasma extender.

dex·tran

(deks'tran),
1. Any of several water-soluble high molecular weight glucose polymers (ranging between MW 1,000 and 40,000,000); produced by the action of members of the family Lactobacillaceae and certain other microorganisms on sucrose; used in isotonic sodium chloride solution for the treatment of shock, and in distilled water for the relief of the edema of nephrosis; lower molecular weight dextran (for example, MW 40,000 designated as dextran 40) improves blood flow in areas of stasis by reducing cellular aggregation.
See also: dextransucrase.
2. α-1,6-glucan with branch points (1,2; 1,3; 1,4) that are spaced in a manner characteristic of the individual species; used as plasma substitutes or expanders.
See also: dextransucrase.

dextran

(dĕk′străn′, -strən)
n.
Any of a group of branched polysaccharides with various molecular weights that are used to prevent thrombosis, as plasma volume expanders, and as food additives.

dextran

Transfusion medicine Dextran-40, dextran-70, dextran-1 A colloid-type volume expander consisting of a large glycogen-like molecules which may occasionally be used in surgical blood management by hemodilution; these substances have the desired properties of being viscid, and gelatinous, resulting in oncotic pressure to retain fluids in vessels; they are widely used as replacement fluids and volume expanders Pros ↓ Allogeneic transfusions, ↓ postoperative bleeding, ↓ blood viscosity Cons Interferes with platelet and RBC function, crossmatching; may cause anaphylaxis and peripheral edema. See Colloid solutions, Crystalloids, Hemodilution, Surgical blood management.

dex·tran

(deks'tran)
Any of several water-soluble high molecular weight glucose polymers; used in isotonic sodium chloride solution for the treatment of shock, and in distilled water for the relief of the edema of nephrosis; lower molecular weight dextran.
See also: dextransucrase

dex·tran

(deks'tran)
Any of several water-soluble high molecular weight glucose polymers; used in isotonic sodium chloride solution to treat shock and to relieve edema of nephrosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the aldehyde group on the oxidized dextran makes it has the ultraviolet absorption.
Formalin, carrageenan, and dextran were used as inflammatory agents.
The scheme representing the entire molecular imprinting approach from dextran modification to the rebinding study is shown in Fig.
Ma, Antibacterial and conductive injectable hydrogels based on quaternized chitosan-graft-polyaniline/oxidized dextran for tissue engineering, Acta biomaterialia 26 (2015) 236-248.
In various applications, such as blood plasma substitution, low molecular weight 40-100 kDa dextran is suitable [17].
A period of mild vascular leakage was observed at one site, with outflow of about 75 [micro][m.sup.3] of dextran at peak for 48-50 min.
For the preparation of Dx-M NPs, dextran (molecular weight 20,000 Da) was dissolved in distilled water.
In this context, it is understandable why dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles are of great interest for future biomedical applications.
In addition, biopolymers such as chitosan [9-11], alginate [12, 13], hyaluronan [14, 15], gum arabic [16, 17], protein [18, 19], gelatin [20], dextran [21], and glucomannan [22] have been also used as stabilizers of colloidal AuNPs solution.
Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induces severe mucosal inflammation and colitis, and DSS-induced colitis is considered a type of UC model in terms of morphological and pathophysiological features [11,12].
Iron dextran, a high molecular weight iron compound, was used extensively in the past but its use was associated with life threatening anaphylaxis.