deviate

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deviate

noun A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for a person who engages in nontraditional and/or bizarre sexual practices.

deviate

(dē′vē-āt″) [L. deviare, to turn aside]
1. To move steadily away from a designated norm.
2. An individual whose behavior, esp. sexual behavior, is so far removed from societal norms that it is classed as socially, morally, or legally unacceptable.
References in periodicals archive ?
To perform the draped profile for the strands, two steel deviators D2 were used at 5300 mm from each end section.
POA spokesman Glynn Travis told the ECHO: "I believe deviators should be used.
Ng Chee Khoon 2000 Provision of Deviators in External Prestressing for RC Beam Strengthening.
A neat bit of illustration of this with respect to the Pharisees is to be found in Matthew 15, where the halakhot of the Pharisees are taken to be innovations; that is, the Christians are the traditionalists and the Pharisees the deviators, but the Pharisees, of course, object that the Christians are "transgressing the traditions of the elders" (v.
Another is that not acting in accordance with collective rationality must be in the long run self-defeating: in a community sharing a conception of rational action, deviators from the equilibrium must eventually and on average do less well.
The ionic domains of zinc sulfonated EPDM may be acting as tear deviators or arrestors.
their writings.(4) Modena urged that the failures of Jews not be credited to their religion but to particular individuals in the community since all religious cultures suffered from deviators. Both in his writings and in his interactions with Christians, including Protestant Englishmen, Modena exhibited religious breadth.
In response specific rules were drawn up relating to the badge and stiff penalties imposed on deviators. In the NUDL rule book of 1901, rule 12 states:
After the service you will return to the citizen with excellent physical training, "- he turned to the deviators.
In natural settings, the role of a leader may encompass a broad range of activities-coordinating and organizing efficient allocation of individual tasks, mediating conflicts, designing incentive schemes, disciplining deviators, maintaining group relations, and so on--and these activities may require different (psychological) qualities.