deviation

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deviation

 [de″ve-a´shun]
1. a turning away from the regular standard or course.
2. in ophthalmology, strabismus.
3. in statistics, the difference between a sample value and the mean.
axis deviation an axis shift in the frontal plane, as seen on an electrocardiogram. There are three types: Left, from −30° to −90°; Right, from +90° to +180°; and Undetermined, which may be either extreme left or extreme right, from −90° to +180°.
conjugate deviation dysfunction of the ocular muscles causing the two eyes to diverge to the same side when at rest.
sexual deviation sexual behavior or fantasy outside that which is morally, biologically, or legally sanctioned, often specifically one of the paraphilias.
standard deviation (SD) the dispersion of a random variable; a measure of the amount by which each value deviates from the mean. It is equal to the square root of the variance. For data that have a normal distribution, about 68 per cent of the data points fall within (plus or minus) one standard deviation from the mean and about 95 per cent fall within (plus or minus) two standard deviations. Symbol σ.
ulnar deviation a hand deformity, seen in chronic rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosus, in which swelling of the metacarpophalangeal joints causes the fingers to become displaced to the ulnar side. Called also ulnar drift. See illustration.
 Ulnar deviation (ulnar drift) of the metacarpophalangeal joint, a characteristic sign of rheumatoid arthritis. From Pedretti and Early, 2001.

de·vi·a·tion

(dē'vē-ā'shŭn),
1. A turning away or aside from the normal point or course.
2. An abnormality.
3. In psychiatry and the behavioral sciences, a departure from an accepted norm, role, or rule. Synonym(s): deviance
4. A statistical measure representing the difference between an individual value in a set of values and the mean value in that set.
[L. devio, to turn from the straight path, fr. de, from, + via, way]

deviation

Vox populi A departure from a norm. See Septal deviation, Standard deviation.

de·vi·a·tion

(dē'vē-ā'shŭn)
1. A turning away or aside from the normal point or course.
2. An abnormality.
3. psychiatry, behavioral sciences A departure from an accepted norm, role, or rule.
Synonym(s): deviance.
4. statistics A measurement representing the difference between an individual value in a set of values and the mean value in that set.
[L. devio, to turn from the straight path, fr. de, from, + via, way]

deviation

See SEXUAL DEVIATION

deviation

1. In strabismus, the departure of the visual axis of one eye from the point of fixation. 2. A change in direction of a light ray resulting from reflection or refraction at an optical surface.angle of d. See angle of deviation.
conjugate deviation The simultaneous and equal rotations of the eyes in any direction. It may be physiological such as versions, or pathological, due to either muscular spasm or paralysis. See disjunctive movements; version.
dissociated vertical deviation  (DVD) A form of strabismus in which one eye apparently moves vertically without any compensatory movement from the other eye. Although initially felt to disobey Hering's law, it is now felt that Hering's law is observed if the horizontal, vertical and rotational aspects of the condition are considered together. This form of strabismus often accompanies infantile esotropia and is almost always noted from the period of infancy. The misalignment can be either latent or manifest, and may require operative intervention if of a great degree. See Faden procedure; Bielschowsky's phenomenon test.
Hering-Hillebrand deviation The deviation of the apparent frontoparallel plane horopter from the Vieth-Müller circle (horopter) (Fig. D2).
minimum deviation of a prism See minimum deviation of a prism.
primary deviation The deviation found in paralysis of an extraocular muscle when the unaffected eye is fixating.
secondary deviation The deviation found in paralysis of an extraocular muscle when the eye with the paralytic muscle is fixating.
skew deviation A form of strabismus, typically vertical, that does not follow any standard or typical pattern and is usually difficult to quantify. It may be due to a midbrain disorder, multiple sclerosis or myasthenia gravis.
vertical deviation 
1. Type of ocular deviation found in strabismus in which the deviating eye is rotated upward with respect to the fixating eye.
2. Upward ocular deviation of an occluded eye in the cover test, as found in hyperphoria or hypophoria.
Fig. D2 Hering-Hillebrand deviation H-H (AFPP, apparent frontoparallel plane horopter); V-M (Vieth-Müller circle; X, fixation point)enlarge picture
Fig. D2 Hering-Hillebrand deviation H-H (AFPP, apparent frontoparallel plane horopter); V-M (Vieth-Müller circle; X, fixation point)

de·vi·a·tion

(dē'vē-ā'shŭn)
1. A turning away or aside from the normal point or course.
2. An abnormality.
[L. devio, to turn from the straight path, fr. de, from, + via, way]
References in periodicals archive ?
The debate between rights advocates, critics, and progressive deviationists continues unabated and, as we shall see, underpins several other forms of jurisprudential analysis.
Even when, as was often the case, they started out as "deviationists" (that is, as communists unhappy with the party line), they eventually came to occupy a wide spectrum of points of view, from nationalism to liberalism to various social democratic tendencies.
Schevardnadze's own father, a teacher of Russian literature, took to the woods in 1937 when there was a drive against "Trotskyite deviationists and class enemies."
Even the trial of the Cardinal-Archbishop, harshly interrogated in the Castle of Zenda before being charged with currency speculations involving a Morinon bank in Salt Lake City, had to be suspended while the new People's Judiciary conducted trials of deviationists or, to be more exact, heard fanciful confessions of Zionism and Titoism.
This group, the self-proclaimed "principalists," brands its opponents on Ahmadinejad's side "deviationists." The principalists would seem to hold an overwhelming advantage in the election, including through the clear support of the Supreme Leader, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, and the overwhelming majority in the Majlis and Guardian Council.
that Ukrainian workers would abandon their language groups and commit themselves to the activities of the newly formed CPC industrial unions." (23) When they failed to comply, the CPC leadership disparaged the ULFTA and its activities (particularly its cultural ones) for being inherently conservative and nationalist and accused the ULFTA CPC members of being "right-wing deviationists," all the while questioning the value of its Ukrainian cultural activities (claiming it distracted the Ukrainians from 'real' activism).
It launched a large-scale national public-awareness campaign early in 2005 which focused on the fact that Islamist extremists are "deviationists" and the message to Saudis that terrorism and extremism, for any reason, are not part of the Islamic faith.
Imagine also the husband as informer; the best friend as enemy; and Khrushchev's 1956 revelations of the purges and killings; then the changing rituals of a besieged party thoroughly flawed--a party that expelled and ostracized, condemned to silence and "non-association" the "deviants" and "left deviationists" in its ever-dwindling midst.
Although, as Comrade Solts declares, "The October Revolution didn't abolish rhymes," Sasha's rhymes are nevertheless offensive enough to get him sent to Siberia, where he reads Gogol and meets Mensheviks, anarchists, Social Revolutionaries, Trotskyists, national deviationists and a priest: "These are people who used to be important."