deviation

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deviation

 [de″ve-a´shun]
1. a turning away from the regular standard or course.
2. in ophthalmology, strabismus.
3. in statistics, the difference between a sample value and the mean.
axis deviation an axis shift in the frontal plane, as seen on an electrocardiogram. There are three types: Left, from −30° to −90°; Right, from +90° to +180°; and Undetermined, which may be either extreme left or extreme right, from −90° to +180°.
conjugate deviation dysfunction of the ocular muscles causing the two eyes to diverge to the same side when at rest.
sexual deviation sexual behavior or fantasy outside that which is morally, biologically, or legally sanctioned, often specifically one of the paraphilias.
standard deviation (SD) the dispersion of a random variable; a measure of the amount by which each value deviates from the mean. It is equal to the square root of the variance. For data that have a normal distribution, about 68 per cent of the data points fall within (plus or minus) one standard deviation from the mean and about 95 per cent fall within (plus or minus) two standard deviations. Symbol σ.
ulnar deviation a hand deformity, seen in chronic rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosus, in which swelling of the metacarpophalangeal joints causes the fingers to become displaced to the ulnar side. Called also ulnar drift. See illustration.
 Ulnar deviation (ulnar drift) of the metacarpophalangeal joint, a characteristic sign of rheumatoid arthritis. From Pedretti and Early, 2001.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·vi·a·tion

(dē'vē-ā'shŭn),
1. A turning away or aside from the normal point or course.
2. An abnormality.
3. In psychiatry and the behavioral sciences, a departure from an accepted norm, role, or rule. Synonym(s): deviance
4. A statistical measure representing the difference between an individual value in a set of values and the mean value in that set.
[L. devio, to turn from the straight path, fr. de, from, + via, way]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deviation

Vox populi A departure from a norm. See Septal deviation, Standard deviation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

de·vi·a·tion

(dē'vē-ā'shŭn)
1. A turning away or aside from the normal point or course.
2. An abnormality.
3. psychiatry, behavioral sciences A departure from an accepted norm, role, or rule.
Synonym(s): deviance.
4. statistics A measurement representing the difference between an individual value in a set of values and the mean value in that set.
[L. devio, to turn from the straight path, fr. de, from, + via, way]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

deviation

See SEXUAL DEVIATION
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

deviation

1. In strabismus, the departure of the visual axis of one eye from the point of fixation. 2. A change in direction of a light ray resulting from reflection or refraction at an optical surface.angle of d. See angle of deviation.
conjugate deviation The simultaneous and equal rotations of the eyes in any direction. It may be physiological such as versions, or pathological, due to either muscular spasm or paralysis. See disjunctive movements; version.
dissociated vertical deviation  (DVD) A form of strabismus in which one eye apparently moves vertically without any compensatory movement from the other eye. Although initially felt to disobey Hering's law, it is now felt that Hering's law is observed if the horizontal, vertical and rotational aspects of the condition are considered together. This form of strabismus often accompanies infantile esotropia and is almost always noted from the period of infancy. The misalignment can be either latent or manifest, and may require operative intervention if of a great degree. See Faden procedure; Bielschowsky's phenomenon test.
Hering-Hillebrand deviation The deviation of the apparent frontoparallel plane horopter from the Vieth-Müller circle (horopter) (Fig. D2).
minimum deviation of a prism See minimum deviation of a prism.
primary deviation The deviation found in paralysis of an extraocular muscle when the unaffected eye is fixating.
secondary deviation The deviation found in paralysis of an extraocular muscle when the eye with the paralytic muscle is fixating.
skew deviation A form of strabismus, typically vertical, that does not follow any standard or typical pattern and is usually difficult to quantify. It may be due to a midbrain disorder, multiple sclerosis or myasthenia gravis.
vertical deviation 
1. Type of ocular deviation found in strabismus in which the deviating eye is rotated upward with respect to the fixating eye.
2. Upward ocular deviation of an occluded eye in the cover test, as found in hyperphoria or hypophoria.
Fig. D2 Hering-Hillebrand deviation H-H (AFPP, apparent frontoparallel plane horopter); V-M (Vieth-Müller circle; X, fixation point)enlarge picture
Fig. D2 Hering-Hillebrand deviation H-H (AFPP, apparent frontoparallel plane horopter); V-M (Vieth-Müller circle; X, fixation point)
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

de·vi·a·tion

(dē'vē-ā'shŭn)
1. A turning away or aside from the normal point or course.
2. An abnormality.
[L. devio, to turn from the straight path, fr. de, from, + via, way]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Prejudice as irrational and deviationist is also associated with irrational emotions, such as hatred or fear of someone who is different.(92) This image of prejudice crystallized during the civil rights movement, when whites saw Governor Faubus preventing little Autherine Lucy(93) from attending a segregated school, sending her home with spittle literally dripping from her dress; when helpless blacks were sent reeling by the high-pressure hoses of southern fire departments; when images of women and children bludgeoned by southern police came into white living rooms.
Thus, in the matter of neutral money as much as in the matter of the quantity theory, Keynes' thesis of the possible persistence of a deficiency of aggregate monetary demand marks him as the great deviationist from classical and neoclassical economics.
By the time he returned to the United States in June he had been expelled from the Communist Party as a "right deviationist." As a supporter of Lovestone Ellen Dawson suffered a similar fate; she lost her position on the Executive Committee of the Communist Party and was expelled from the National Textile Workers' Union.
Some of the wording of the anti-pornography legislation which may (inter alia) extend to public dances, restrictions on the "deviationist"' sect Ahmaddiyah, as well as the incorporation of elements of Sharia law in particular districts make the issue a live one and raise the spectre of Islamism by stealth.
This idea was strengthened by the fact that Kullervo Manner, the leader of the People's Deputation in 1918 and SKP chairman from 1920 to 1934, had been removed as a deviationist and remained largely unmentioned.
The Government asserted that "deviationist" teachings could cause divisions among Muslims.
In 1996 the division "identified the existence of forty-seven deviationist groups, 15 of which were described as active and involving some 1,000 followers." (19)
Farrell, the Trotskyite deviationist who used to correct my every error in notes that were barely legible, gave us not only a trilogy about Studs Lonigan but a tetralogy about Danny O'Neill, who was radicalized at the University of Chicago before Nathan Zuckerman wasn't.
The outcome was predictable: In April 1929 Stalin declared Bukharin a "Right deviationist," and in November Bukharin was ousted from the Politburo (Stalin had him shot in 1938).
IN A SIMPLIFIED history, China's prosperity may be charted by the rise of Deng, whom from an early stage Mao had sniffed out as a "capitalist roader." Later, Deng was descirbed with more elaborate contempt as "an arch unrepentant capitalist roader and harbinger of the right deviationist wind." Yet this comrade in arms turned pariah is someone who, politically speaking, came back from the dead--and not once but three times.
They have been described as holding deviationist religious views about the power of djinns, figures in the Qoran that are often viewed by villagers as a sort of Islamic leprechaun.