deviant behavior


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deviant behavior

actions that exceed the usual limits of accepted behavior and involve failure to comply with the social norm of the group.

de·vi·ant be·ha·vior

(dē'vē-ănt bē-hāv'yŏr)
Activity that is proscribed by custom, social mores, or laws intended to curb or discourage such activity.

deviant behavior

Any behavior considered to be grossly abnormal.
References in periodicals archive ?
We suggest that this structure, along with temporal dependencies and patterns of sequentially executed actions, can be exploited to perform deviant behavior detection on traces of agent activities over time.
In response, the conservative school defended the description, saying it represented no more than the chapter headings of the course's primary textbook, Sociology of Deviant Behavior by Marshall B.
Many schools are mandating antibullying programs and policies, and we think they need to take this opportunity to address other forms of deviant behavior, such as substance use," posits Radliff.
The quality of family relationships and deviant behavior also will be analyzed, as they have been considered theoretically relevant variables related to child and adolescent victimization (e.
Topics begin with integrated theories of sexual offending and deviance over the life span (including reports on reductions in deviant behavior in the aging sex offender).
Methamphetamine use was associated with deviant behavior such as selling drugs and binge drinking, which suggests that adolescents who use methamphetamine may be more likely to be exposed to delinquent peers and dangerous environments, the researchers said.
When, as in this work, excellence reflects performance outside two standard deviations of the mean, it is by definition a reflection of deviant behavior.
Even though it now seems little more than a symbolic gesture, it will still supposedly force schools to ``promote'' homosexuality and other sexually deviant behavior.
Johnston, "Routine Activities and Individual Deviant Behavior," American Sociological Review 61 (1996): 635-655.
Gottfredson and Hirschi (1990) thus view deviant behavior as essentially unsocialized behavior, and argue that self-control is an acquired characteristic that is produced through early childhood socialization.
First, research has not detailed the social processes by which rules supporting deviant behavior are learned, maintained and elaborated, and about how such rules facilitate deviant behavior.
This finding suggests that some African American adolescents associate being Black and male with deviant behavior and academic disengagement.