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development

 [de-vel´up-ment]
1. growth and differentiation.
cognitive development the development of intelligence, conscious thought, and problem-solving ability that begins in infancy.
community health development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating members of a community to identify the community's health concerns, mobilize resources, and implement solutions.
critical path development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as constructing and using a timed sequence of patient care activities to enhance desired patient outcomes in a cost-efficient manner. See also critical path.
program development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as planning, implementing, and evaluating a coordinated set of activities designed to enhance wellness or to prevent, reduce, or eliminate one or more health problems of a group or community.
psychosexual development
1. generally, the development of the psychological aspects of sexuality from birth to maturity.
2. In psychoanalytic theory, the development of object relations has five stages: the oral stage from birth to 2 years, the anal stage from 2 to 4 years, the phallic stage from 4 to 6 years, the latency stage from 6 years until puberty, and the genital stage from puberty onward; see also sexual development.
psychosocial development the development of the personality, including the acquisition of social attitudes and skills, from infancy through maturity.
risk for delayed development a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for delay of 25 per cent or more in one or more of the areas of social or self-regulatory behavior, or in cognitive, language, gross motor, or fine motor skills.
sexual development see sexual development.
staff development
1. an educational program for health care providers conducted by a hospital or other institution; it includes orientation, in-service training, and continuing education.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as developing, maintaining, and monitoring competence of staff.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·vel·op·ment

(dē-vel'ŏp-ment),
1. The act or process of natural progression in physical and psychological maturation from a previous, lower, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.
2. The process of chromatography.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

development

(dĭ-vĕl′əp-mənt)
n.
1. The act of developing.
2. The state of being developed.
3. A significant event, occurrence, or change.
4. The natural progression from a previous, simpler, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.

de·vel′op·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
The act of improving by expanding or enlarging or refining
Embryology The process of growth and differentiation into a mature adult organism
Evidence-based medicine See Consensus development
Global village See Sustainable development
Graduate education See Continuing professional development
Neurology See Cognitive development, Motor development
Paediatrics See Plateau development
Pharmaceutical industry The advancing of a single drug compound of interest identified in a research program through its approval for marketing by the FDA and other regulatory agencies
Psychology See Psychosexual development
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·vel·op·ment

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-mĕnt)
1. The act or process of natural progression in physical and psychological maturation from a previous, lower, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.
2. The process of chromatography.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

development

the proceeding towards maturity of eggs, embryos or young organisms.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

de·vel·op·ment

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-mĕnt)
The act or process of natural progression in physical and psychological maturation from a previous, lower, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about development

Q. What week does the baby's brain develop? In which week of the pregnancy does the baby develop his brain?

A. I found a website that shows how your baby develops in the womb and also has pictures:
http://www.pregnancy.org/pregnancy/fetaldevelopment1.php

Q. What is the most common preventable cause of childhood development delay?

A. The most common cause of severe developmental delay (essentially mental retardation) is genetic abnormalities (or more accurately, cytogenetic abnormalities due to abnormal chromosomes). Other cause include damage during the pregnancy such as infections or serious diseases in the mother, damage (such as choking or insufficient blood supply to the fetus) during labor and metabolic diseases such as PKU or hypothyroididsm that affect young babies.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/MEDLINEPLUS/ency/article/001523.htm

Q. How worse the symptoms of Bipolar can develop?

A. Undiagnosed or unmedicated bipolar disorder can be fatal. A bipolar patient in a state of depression is at a higher risk of suicide where in a manic state a bipolar patient can take life threatening risks. Ie jumping off of a bridge because they think it will be fun or that they are invincable. It is extreamly important that a person suffering from bipolar disorder recieve proper treatment in order to control the symptoms of the illness.

More discussions about development
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References in periodicals archive ?
MSG's move would free up a valuable parcel whose development into office towers could provide significant financing for West Side infrastructure.
Career-related articles from the Journal of Counseling & Development, Counselor Education and Supervision, Professional School Counseling, Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, Journal of Counseling Psychology, The Counseling Psychologist, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, Journal of College Counseling, Journal of College Student Development, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, and Psychological Reports were included in this review.
* Mark Meixner, director business development, Hercules Pulp and Paper Division, Wilmington, Delaware
There is growing interest in modeling the potential health impacts of global environmental changes and in exploring, through scenario development, how current health risks could evolve with changes in environmental, technologic, economic, and societal conditions.
Throughout the pilot so far, a number of issues have emerged that may inform future developments. Firstly, we did have a problem with the lack of potential mentors, the main barrier being the time commitment.
So while eyeing his gas gauge, which dips precariously into the red zone, Coffman winds in and out of a mind-boggling number of developments until he reaches one called Northridge.
In San Francisco, for example, the Greenbelt Alliance Compact Development Endorsement Program supports infill housing and developments if they are transit oriented or affordable.
Lang and Wood propose a package of incentives that may help promote development of orphan vaccines by major manufacturers.
Aspin said that if the plan is carried out, the developments would act as a "recession fighter" in the future.
The development team philosophy revolves around the deaf-blind consumer, and adds a supporting team of educators, rehabilitation specialists, engineers, and scientists.
Within 12 months, I will have arranged approximately $1.4 billion in acquisition, mezzanine, bridge, construction and permanent loans, reflecting the robust nature of the ongoing residential development boom.
The NIEHS, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invite applications for the development and delivery of novel in vivo image acquisition or enhancement technologies, methods for biomedical imaging, and image-guided interventions and therapy.

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