development

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development

 [de-vel´up-ment]
1. growth and differentiation.
cognitive development the development of intelligence, conscious thought, and problem-solving ability that begins in infancy.
community health development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating members of a community to identify the community's health concerns, mobilize resources, and implement solutions.
critical path development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as constructing and using a timed sequence of patient care activities to enhance desired patient outcomes in a cost-efficient manner. See also critical path.
program development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as planning, implementing, and evaluating a coordinated set of activities designed to enhance wellness or to prevent, reduce, or eliminate one or more health problems of a group or community.
psychosexual development
1. generally, the development of the psychological aspects of sexuality from birth to maturity.
2. In psychoanalytic theory, the development of object relations has five stages: the oral stage from birth to 2 years, the anal stage from 2 to 4 years, the phallic stage from 4 to 6 years, the latency stage from 6 years until puberty, and the genital stage from puberty onward; see also sexual development.
psychosocial development the development of the personality, including the acquisition of social attitudes and skills, from infancy through maturity.
risk for delayed development a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for delay of 25 per cent or more in one or more of the areas of social or self-regulatory behavior, or in cognitive, language, gross motor, or fine motor skills.
sexual development see sexual development.
staff development
1. an educational program for health care providers conducted by a hospital or other institution; it includes orientation, in-service training, and continuing education.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as developing, maintaining, and monitoring competence of staff.

de·vel·op·ment

(dē-vel'ŏp-ment),
1. The act or process of natural progression in physical and psychological maturation from a previous, lower, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.
2. The process of chromatography.

development

/de·vel·op·ment/ (de-vel´up-mint) the process of growth and differentiation.developmen´tal
cognitive development  the development of intelligence, conscious thought, and problem-solving ability that begins in infancy.
psychosexual development 
1. development of the individual's sexuality as affected by biological, cultural, and emotional influences from prenatal life onward throughout life.
2. in psychoanalysis, libidinal maturation from infancy through adulthood (including the oral, anal, and genital stages).
psychosocial development  the development of the personality, and the acquisition of social attitudes and skills, from infancy through maturity.

development

(dĭ-vĕl′əp-mənt)
n.
1. The act of developing.
2. The state of being developed.
3. A significant event, occurrence, or change.
4. The natural progression from a previous, simpler, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.

de·vel′op·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.

development

Etymology: Fr, developper, to unfold
1 the gradual process of change and differentiation from a simple to a more advanced level of complexity. In humans the physical, mental, and emotional capacities that allow complex adaptation to the environment and function within society are acquired through growth, maturation, and learning. Kinds of development include arrested development, mosaic development, psychomotor development, psychosexual development, psychosocial development, and regulative development.
2 (in biology) the series of events that occur within an organism from the time of fertilization of the ovum to the adult stage. See also film development. developmental, adj.
The act of improving by expanding or enlarging or refining
Embryology The process of growth and differentiation into a mature adult organism
Evidence-based medicine See Consensus development
Global village See Sustainable development
Graduate education See Continuing professional development
Neurology See Cognitive development, Motor development
Paediatrics See Plateau development
Pharmaceutical industry The advancing of a single drug compound of interest identified in a research program through its approval for marketing by the FDA and other regulatory agencies
Psychology See Psychosexual development

de·vel·op·ment

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-mĕnt)
1. The act or process of natural progression in physical and psychological maturation from a previous, lower, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.
2. The process of chromatography.

development

the proceeding towards maturity of eggs, embryos or young organisms.

de·vel·op·ment

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-mĕnt)
The act or process of natural progression in physical and psychological maturation from a previous, lower, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.

development,

n the process by which an individual reaches maturity.

development

the process of growth and differentiation.

Patient discussion about development

Q. What week does the baby's brain develop? In which week of the pregnancy does the baby develop his brain?

A. I found a website that shows how your baby develops in the womb and also has pictures:
http://www.pregnancy.org/pregnancy/fetaldevelopment1.php

Q. What is the most common preventable cause of childhood development delay?

A. The most common cause of severe developmental delay (essentially mental retardation) is genetic abnormalities (or more accurately, cytogenetic abnormalities due to abnormal chromosomes). Other cause include damage during the pregnancy such as infections or serious diseases in the mother, damage (such as choking or insufficient blood supply to the fetus) during labor and metabolic diseases such as PKU or hypothyroididsm that affect young babies.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/MEDLINEPLUS/ency/article/001523.htm

Q. How worse the symptoms of Bipolar can develop?

A. Undiagnosed or unmedicated bipolar disorder can be fatal. A bipolar patient in a state of depression is at a higher risk of suicide where in a manic state a bipolar patient can take life threatening risks. Ie jumping off of a bridge because they think it will be fun or that they are invincable. It is extreamly important that a person suffering from bipolar disorder recieve proper treatment in order to control the symptoms of the illness.

More discussions about development
References in periodicals archive ?
Part I (pages 17 to 31) gives an up to date state of human development in Arab countries.
The names of respected experts on development questions from different parts of the world could have added a dimension of contrast, useful for understanding some specific problems of the Arab world.
The purpose of the annual review is to organize the career development literature that was published within a given year conceptually and to present it in a manner that is applicable for career practitioners.
We restricted our review to articles that were relevant to traditional aspects of career development and practice.
If large manufacturers shift vaccine development priorities on the basis of incentives and other measures so that the total number of products brought to market is not increased but one set of priorities is substituted for another, the overall impact on disease prevention may be not change.
The group toured the most viable development sites in Peekskill and exchanged ideas and information that could inject new life into the city's revitalization efforts.
No collection of articles on managing human resources in research libraries would be complete without a discussion of staff development.
The development team philosophy revolves around the deaf-blind consumer, and adds a supporting team of educators, rehabilitation specialists, engineers, and scientists.
Developments in business and industry, in community colleges, and in career centers have contributed to this phenomenon.
Goldman, Stephen Lefkowitz, and Max Friedman, three development lawyers involved in many of the most ambitious, high-profile private and public/private projects of the last decade and today, have signed on as senior partners with the formerly traditional real estate practice of Winthrop, Stimson, Putnam & Roberts.
We have always admired and appreciated the time, energy, and effort that authors of The Career Development Quarterly annual review have expended to provide readers with a comprehensive, yet succinct, summary of literature.

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