developmental psychology


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psychology

 [si-kol´o-je]
the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior. adj., adj psycholog´ic, psycholog´ical.
analytic psychology (analytical psychology) the system of psychology founded by Carl Gustav Jung, based on the concepts of the collective unconscious and the complex.
clinical psychology the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology the application of psychological principles to the study and support of the mental health of individuals in their social sphere.
criminal psychology the study of the mentality, the motivation, and the social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology the study of unconscious mental processes.
developmental psychology the study of changes in behavior that occur with age.
dynamic psychology psychology stressing the causes and motivations for behavior.
environmental psychology study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
forensic psychology psychology dealing with the legal aspects of behavior and mental disorders.
gestalt psychology gestaltism; the theory that the objects of mind, as immediately presented to direct experience, come as complete unanalyzable wholes or forms that cannot be split into parts.
individual psychology the psychiatric theory of Alfred adler, stressing compensation and overcompensation for feelings of inferiority and the interpersonal nature of a person's problems.
physiologic psychology (physiological psychology) the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology psychology that focuses on social interaction, on the ways in which actions of others influence the behavior of an individual.

de·vel·op·men·tal psy·chol·o·gy

the study of the psychological, physiologic, and behavioral changes in an organism that occur from birth to old age.

developmental psychology

n.
The branch of psychology concerned with the study of progressive behavioral changes in an individual from birth until maturity.

de·vel·op·men·tal psy·chol·o·gy

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-men'tăl sī-kol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the psychological, physiologic, and behavioral changes in an organism that occur from birth to old age.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the preceding paragraphs, we have outlined a relationally integrated systems model as a way to think about integration between developmental psychology and faith, and as a theoretical model within developmental psychology that does justice to development in general and faith development in particular.
This idea appears to have firmly taken root in Developmental Psychology, as stated by Lerner (1998): "in contemporary developmental theories, the person is not biologized, psychologized or sociologized.
The only significant finding regarding gender was again for pretest topical interests, with female students again more interested in developmental psychology than male students.
These segments of research articles, which relate to specific areas of developmental psychology, illustrate the way in which information is synthesized from actual research to the text.
Gary Chalus, "Defensive Compensation as a Response to Ego Threat: A Replication," Psychological Reports 38 (June, 1976): 699-702; Patricia East and Karen Rook, "Compensatory Patterns of Support among Children's Peer Relationships," Developmental Psychology 28 (June, 1992): 163-72; Jeff Greenberg and Tom Pyszczynski, "Compensatory Self-inflation: A Response to the Threat to Self-Regard of Public Failure," Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 49 (June, 1985): 273-80.
Developmental psychology provides a perspective that illuminates substantive phenomena in psychology, applies across the life span, has its own value, and has manifest relevance to everyday life.
The recent publication of two books within Routledge's 'Critical Psychology' series provides an opportunity to consider whether developmental psychology might be the second branch of the discipline to take up the challenges posed by post-structuralism, here represented by Erica Burman's Deconstructing developmental psychology and John Morss's Growing critical.
That work enrolled her in a running seminar on the latest research in developmental psychology, while her isolation encouraged her to see all that work with an outsider's skepticism.
Among them was a student, Jelena Vranjesevic, now a lecturer in developmental psychology at the Education Faculty of Belgrade University.
The efforts to bring Erik Erikson's developmental psychology to bear on identity politics surely have the feel of affirmative resolution and ironed-out contradictions; at the extreme, Hoover's recommendation of this developmental approach lacks critical distance, and he stands too ready to offer solutions to complex social issues that have long plagued the public sphere.
The central purpose of this ambitious book is to bring to bear theories of developmental psychology upon the liberal-communitarian debate of the 1980s: Lawrence Kohlberg meets Michael Sandel.

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