development

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development

 [de-vel´up-ment]
1. growth and differentiation.
cognitive development the development of intelligence, conscious thought, and problem-solving ability that begins in infancy.
community health development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating members of a community to identify the community's health concerns, mobilize resources, and implement solutions.
critical path development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as constructing and using a timed sequence of patient care activities to enhance desired patient outcomes in a cost-efficient manner. See also critical path.
program development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as planning, implementing, and evaluating a coordinated set of activities designed to enhance wellness or to prevent, reduce, or eliminate one or more health problems of a group or community.
psychosexual development
1. generally, the development of the psychological aspects of sexuality from birth to maturity.
2. In psychoanalytic theory, the development of object relations has five stages: the oral stage from birth to 2 years, the anal stage from 2 to 4 years, the phallic stage from 4 to 6 years, the latency stage from 6 years until puberty, and the genital stage from puberty onward; see also sexual development.
psychosocial development the development of the personality, including the acquisition of social attitudes and skills, from infancy through maturity.
risk for delayed development a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for delay of 25 per cent or more in one or more of the areas of social or self-regulatory behavior, or in cognitive, language, gross motor, or fine motor skills.
sexual development see sexual development.
staff development
1. an educational program for health care providers conducted by a hospital or other institution; it includes orientation, in-service training, and continuing education.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as developing, maintaining, and monitoring competence of staff.

de·vel·op·ment

(dē-vel'ŏp-ment),
1. The act or process of natural progression in physical and psychological maturation from a previous, lower, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.
2. The process of chromatography.

development

(dĭ-vĕl′əp-mənt)
n.
1. The act of developing.
2. The state of being developed.
3. A significant event, occurrence, or change.
4. The natural progression from a previous, simpler, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.

de·vel′op·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.
The act of improving by expanding or enlarging or refining
Embryology The process of growth and differentiation into a mature adult organism
Evidence-based medicine See Consensus development
Global village See Sustainable development
Graduate education See Continuing professional development
Neurology See Cognitive development, Motor development
Paediatrics See Plateau development
Pharmaceutical industry The advancing of a single drug compound of interest identified in a research program through its approval for marketing by the FDA and other regulatory agencies
Psychology See Psychosexual development

de·vel·op·ment

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-mĕnt)
1. The act or process of natural progression in physical and psychological maturation from a previous, lower, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.
2. The process of chromatography.

development

the proceeding towards maturity of eggs, embryos or young organisms.

de·vel·op·ment

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-mĕnt)
The act or process of natural progression in physical and psychological maturation from a previous, lower, or embryonic stage to a later, more complex, or adult stage.

Patient discussion about development

Q. What week does the baby's brain develop? In which week of the pregnancy does the baby develop his brain?

A. I found a website that shows how your baby develops in the womb and also has pictures:
http://www.pregnancy.org/pregnancy/fetaldevelopment1.php

Q. What is the most common preventable cause of childhood development delay?

A. The most common cause of severe developmental delay (essentially mental retardation) is genetic abnormalities (or more accurately, cytogenetic abnormalities due to abnormal chromosomes). Other cause include damage during the pregnancy such as infections or serious diseases in the mother, damage (such as choking or insufficient blood supply to the fetus) during labor and metabolic diseases such as PKU or hypothyroididsm that affect young babies.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/MEDLINEPLUS/ency/article/001523.htm

Q. How worse the symptoms of Bipolar can develop?

A. Undiagnosed or unmedicated bipolar disorder can be fatal. A bipolar patient in a state of depression is at a higher risk of suicide where in a manic state a bipolar patient can take life threatening risks. Ie jumping off of a bridge because they think it will be fun or that they are invincable. It is extreamly important that a person suffering from bipolar disorder recieve proper treatment in order to control the symptoms of the illness.

More discussions about development
References in periodicals archive ?
The Recreation Partnership Project provides a dynamic and innovative approach towards engaging children in health-related activities, while the Play Development Section delivers an extensive range of services to statutory and community organisations The Leisure United Project aims to integrate children with disabilities into mainstream activities, as well as improving disability provision within schools and in the community.
When contacted, Project Director Maj (r) Azaz and Project Coordinator Ashraf Shad said all sort of information lies with the Planning and Development Section o in Islamabad.
Mr Shinichi HONDA, First Secretary, Deputy Head, Economic and Development Section, Embassy of Japan in Islamabad, said that 70 per cent of schools, colleges and universities in Japan have several facilities for promotion of sports.
The National Coaching Programme features 12 training missions, as the Sports Training and Development Section seeks to present a series of similar course as per their annual plan.
Defeat was no disgrace, as Harrogate's first team play in the Vanarama Conference North, and their development section recruit from wide area.
All art and craft materials were provided free by Redcar and Cleveland Council's events and play development section. And thanks to donations from local businesses, puzzles, games and selection boxes were donated to Zoe's Place baby hospice in Normanby.
2 and the Community Health Planning and Policy Development Section will be doing its annual community outreach activity.
The programme is conducted by the Bahrain Olympic Committee (BOC) sports training and development section in cooperation with the Coaching Association of Canada (CAC).
The junior development section of the Whitley Bay Ice Hockey Club are hoping for your Wish tokens to help them pay for new equipment and ice rental.
The campaign was organised by the Environment Protection and Development Section of the municipality in conjunction with the Emirates Environmental Group (EEG) as part of EEG's Can Collection Day.
youth development section provides a facility for young people to develop their footballing skills in a safe and friendly environment.
The Collection Management and Development Section of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services announced that Tim Jewell is the recipient of the first annual Coutts Award for Innovation in Electronic Resources Management.

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