deturgescence

de·tur·ges·cence

(dē'tūr-ges'ents),
The mechanism by which the stroma of the cornea remains relatively dehydrated.
[L. de, from, + turgesco, to begin to swell]

deturgescence

State of relative dehydration maintained by the normal cornea that is necessary for transparency. It is maintained by the epithelium, which to a large extent is impermeable to water, and also by a metabolic transport system in the endothelium.
References in periodicals archive ?
This reservoir continuously bathes the cornea, providing corneal deturgescence for a relatively longer period.
It was recognized that after cutting, the graft underwent deturgescence and became thinner (11,16-18).
We evaluated corneal deturgescence after conventional DSAEK by comparing preoperative and postoperative central lamellar thickeness.
As is commonly acknowledged, the deturgescence and clarity of the cornea depends on the pump-leak mechanism of monolayer cells lining the inner surface.
The cornea has as a feature the transparency in demanding chemical environments due to its mechanism of deturgescence and organization of collagenous fibers as well as presence of sutures found in the stromal layer (Tolpin et al., 1969).
The corneal endothelium maintains stromal deturgescence, which is a prerequisite for corneal transparency (SRINIVAS, 2010).
Vision improves as the day progresses as evaporation promotes corneal deturgescence. Glare can be particularly bothersome for patients with FED even when cataract is not advanced due to adherent endothelial pigment.
The corneal endothelium comprises a rich density of regularly arranged hexagonal cells that maintains corneal deturgescence. There is an average of 4000 cells/[mm.sup.2] in the first decade of life and this number reduces at an average rate of 0.6% every year.