detrusor

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detrusor

 [de-troo´ser]
1. a body part that pushes down, such as a muscle.
2. pertaining to the detrusor muscle of the bladder; see anatomic Table of Muscles in the Appendices.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·tru·sor

(dē-trū'sŏr),
1. A muscle that has the action of expelling a substance.
2.
[L. detrudo, to drive away]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

de·tru·sor

(dĕ-trū'sŏr)
A muscle that has the action of expelling a substance.
[L. detrudo, to drive away]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

detrusor

1. Any entity that pushes down.
2. The muscle of the bladder.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Detrusor

Muscle of the bladder wall.
Mentioned in: Cystometry
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The KATP channels were reported to mediate the contractions of detrusor muscles [23].
Ding, "Inhibitory effects of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel openers cromakalim, pinacidil and minoxidil on the carbachol-response curve in porcine detrusor muscle," Arab Journal of Urology, vol.
The bladder wall contains 3 muscle layers that together form the detrusor muscle. Two sphincters, rings of muscle located on either side of the bladder neck, control urine flow through the urethra.
This stimulation produces neurological signals that trigger the detrusor muscle to contract, increasing awareness of bladder pressure.
Urge incontinence is a condition in which bladder-brain miscommunication produces frequent and inappropriate detrusor muscle contractions.
Overflow incontinence, estimated to occur in 7% to 11% of elderly patients, is usually the result of obstructed urinary outflow or contractile dysfunction in which the detrusor muscle does not contract enough to expel urine.
This includes patients who have weak detrusor muscle contractions resulting from diabetes, Parkinson disease and spinal cord injuries or who take medications that interfere with bladder emptying.