deterministic effect

deterministic effect

(dē-tĕr″mĭ-nis′tik)
An effect that has a threshold of chemical or radiation exposure below which are no measurable effects and above which the severity is dose-related.
References in periodicals archive ?
The author argues that depictions of gambling were influenced by evolutionism and DarwinEs ideas about the deterministic effect of chance.
The threshold dose for a specific deterministic effect depends on the type of radiation, on the dose-rate pattern over time (i.
It is evident that smaller doses of radiation, which are generally encountered in many diagnostic procedures, may not exceed the threshold dose for deterministic effects.
4) The main biological effects caused by ionising radiation are stochastic and deterministic (non-stochastic) effects; stochastic effects may occur while deterministic effects will occur.
13) According to one expert, doses greater than 25 rem are often received in a short period of time, producing deterministic effects, the severity of which increases with dose.
Ionising radiation has either stochastic or deterministic effects on the exposed individual.
They cover basic radiation physics, chemistry and biology, sources of possible radiation exposure, effects on genetic materials, cancer induction and dose-responsive models, carginogenesis of specific sites, deterministic effects of radiation and effects in combination with other agents, exposure in utero, psychological perceptions about radiation, hormesis, effects on individuals, and comparisons of uranium, plutonium, and radium.
There are several deterministic effects of interest to radiologic technologists, including cataract formation in the lens of the eye and fertility impairment.
A tentative finding is that deterministic effects are relatively more important than stochastic ones.
Historically, the first permissible dose proposed was linked to deterministic effects of ionizing radiation.
Lewis suggests a view of development that minimalizes the potential for lasting, deterministic effects of a child's early experiences without careful consideration of the context - individual, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural - of the child at later ages.
In comparison with stochastic effects, deterministic effects are a greater cause of concern in diagnostic radiology as they occur above a certain threshold dose.
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