detergent

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detergent

 [de-ter´jent]
1. purifying or cleansing.
2. an agent that purifies or cleanses.
3. in biochemistry, any of a class of agents structurally consisting of a nonpolar hydrocarbon chain and a hydrophilic polar head group, which reduce the surface tension of water, emulsify, and aid in solubilization of soil.

de·ter·gent

(dē-tĕr'jent),
1. Cleansing.
2. A cleansing or purging agent, usually salts of long-chain aliphatic bases or acids (for example, quaternary ammonium or sulfonic acid compounds) that, through a surface action that depends on their possessing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties, exert cleansing (oil-dissolving) and antibacterial effects; acridine derivatives (for example, acriflavine, proflavine) as well as other dyes (for example, brilliant green, crystal violet) have detergent properties for the same reasons.
Synonym(s): detersive
[L. de-tergeo, pp. -tersus, to wipe off]

detergent

/de·ter·gent/ (de-ter´jent)
1. purifying, cleansing.
2. an agent that purifies or cleanses.
3. in biochemistry, any of a class of agents, characterized by a hydrophilic polar head group attached to a nonpolar hydrocarbon chain, which reduce the surface tension of water, emulsify, and aid in the solubilization of soil.

detergent

[ditur′jənt]
Etymology: L, detergere, to cleanse
1 a cleansing agent.
2 (in respiratory therapy) a wetting agent that is administered to mediate the removal of respiratory tract secretions from airway walls. See also surfactant.

de·ter·gent

(dĕ-tĕr'jĕnt)
A cleansing or purging agent, usually salts of long-chain aliphatic bases or acids that, through a surface action that depends on their possessing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties, exert cleansing (i.e., oil-dissolving) and antibacterial effects.
[L. de-tergeo, pp. -tersus, to wipe off]

detergent

a substance that when dissolved in water acts as a cleansing agent for the removal of grease by altering the interfacial tension of water with other liquids or solids. Powerful detergents are used to break up oil spillages at sea.

de·ter·gent

(dĕ-tĕr'jĕnt)
A cleansing or purging agent that provides cleansing (i.e., oil-dissolving) and antibacterial effects.
[L. de-tergeo, pp. -tersus, to wipe off]

detergent (dētur´jənt),

n a cleanser. Also applied in a more specific sense to chemicals that possess surface-active properties in water and whose solutions are therefore able to wet surfaces that are normally water repellent, thereby assisting in the mechanical dispersion and emulsification of fatty or oily material and other substances that soil the surface.
detergent, anionic,
n a detergent in which the cleansing action resides in the anion. Soaps and many synthetic detergents are anionic.
detergent, cationic,
n a detergent in which the cleansing action resides in the cation. Many are strong germicides (e.g., those that contain quaternary ammonium compounds).
detergent, nonionic,
n a cleanser that acts by depressing the surface tension of water but does not ionize.
detergent, synthetic,
n a cleanser, other than soap, that exerts its effect by lowering the surface tension of an aqueous cleansing mixture.

detergent

1. purifying, cleansing.
2. an agent that purifies or cleanses.

anionic detergent
a substance which when dissolved contributes a hydrophobic ion which carries a negative charge to the solution. Soap is an example.
cationic detergent
the dissociated substance produces a positively charged hydrophobic ion. The quarternary ammonium compounds are the best known examples. They are innocuous if properly diluted but the concentrates are very poisonous.
nonionic surface-acting detergent
e.g. the polyoxyethylenes are regarded as nonpoisonous.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specially designed for optimum detergency with minimum foaming, this product has numerous applications on a variety of hard surfaces where outstanding cleaning is required.
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The promotion was part of the Shell summer campaign built on the company's commitment to provide high quality fuel to motorists and educate consumers that all Shell gasolines not only surpass government standards for detergency, they meet top automakers' highest standard.
Reducing surface tension and providing good wetting are key attributes to effective detergency and cleaning performance.
Uniqema also offers a wide range of effect technologies, such as detergency, hydrotroping, emulsification, rinsability and foam control to cleaning product makers.
Attributes/Comments: This water dispersible cationic silicone also contains a lipophile providing strong surface activity, good detergency and affinity to surfaces.
Its performance features include; comprehensive additive package, good detergency, good oxidation stability and good anti-wear properties.
Triton CG-425 alkyl polyglucoside surfactant is said to be compatible with many cleaning formulations and mild to the skin, while offering good wetting and detergency properties, low streaking and filming and producing stable foam in many hard surface cleaning applications.
DRILL-TERGE: Liquid solution of nonionic surfactant formulated to increase detergency and wetting properties of drilling fluids.
Its natural detergency maintains cleaner chains resulting in less operational problems.
Detergency is an essential component to mobilize hydrocarbon phases after wetting to remove them from the pipeline wall.