destructive lesion


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destructive lesion

Etymology: L, destruere, to destroy, laesio, a hurting
a disorder that leads to the damage or necrosis of an organ or tissue.

destructive lesion

A pathological change such as an infection, tumor, or injury that causes the death of tissue or an organ.
See also: lesion
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical suspicion for Pott's disease should be high for any patient who presents with a destructive lesion of the spine.
The pathophysiology of cocaine-induced midline destructive lesions is multifactorial and includes local ischemia secondary to vasoconstriction, chemical irritation from adulterants put in "cut" cocaine, and infection secondary to trauma, impaired mucociliary transport, and decreased humoral and cell-mediated immunity.
In SAPHO syndrome, destructive lesions progress associated with marginal sclerosis explaining why destructive spondylodiscitis progresses slowly.
There were no bony erosions or destructive lesions and joint spaces were normal.
Radiologic features vary from undefined destructive lesions to a well-defined, multilocular appearance.
Knowledge of the clinical and histological behavior of the odontogenic cyst is needed to ensure early detection and prompt treatment of these noncancerous but potentially destructive lesions.
Cholesteatomas are non-neoplastic but destructive lesions consisting of desquamating keratin epithelium.
In addition, immunocompromised patients can have progressive, destructive lesions requiring medical interventions such as antiviral therapy (9) and surgical debridement (10).
Complications consisted of foot drop in two patients, both of which had large destructive lesions involving the sacrum.
One indication for MRI at midgestation emerges when there are borderline findings on ultrasound, such as those that might be seen with progressive or destructive lesions that won't be fully realized until late in pregnancy.
The remaining 10 patients underwent intestinal biopsies, 9 of whom showed evidence of hyperplastic or destructive lesions consistent with CD.
As an alternative to destructive lesions, much interest is currently directed to the use of stereotactically implanted permanent quadripolar electrodes and impulse generators for deep brain stimulation (DBS).