behavior

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behavior

 [be-hāv´yer]
the observable responses, actions, or activities of someone. adj., adj behav´ioral.
adaptive behavior behavior that fosters effective or successful individual interaction with the environment.
contingent behavior actions that are dependent upon a specific stimulus.
behavior disorder a general concept referring to any type of behavioral abnormality that is functional in origin.
disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant.
health seeking b's see health seeking behaviors.
behavior modification
1. an approach to correction of undesirable conduct that focuses on changing observable actions. Modification of the behavior is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be changed. The principles and techniques of this method have been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also conditioning.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of a behavior change.
behavior modification (omaha) on the second level of the intervention scheme of the omaha system, a target definition defined as activities designed to promote a change of habits.
behavior modification: social skills in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to develop or improve interpersonal social skills.
readiness for enhanced organized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as a pattern of modulation of the physiologic and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant, which is satisfactory but can be improved, resulting in higher levels of integration in response to environmental stimuli.
risk for disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as the risk for alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning in an infant; see also disorganized infant behavior.
behavior therapy a therapeutic approach in which the focus is on the patient's observable behavior, rather than on conflicts and unconscious processes presumed to underlie his maladaptive behavior. This is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be modified; operant conditioning, systematic desensitization, token economy, aversive control, flooding, and implosion are examples of techniques that may be used in behavior therapy. Studies of classical and operant conditioning form the basis of behavior therapy, which has been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also behavior modification.

be·hav·ior

(bē-hāv'yōr),
1. Any response emitted by or elicited from an organism.
2. Any mental or motor act or activity.
3. Specifically, parts of a total response pattern.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr. avoir, to have]

behavior

(bĭ-hāv′yər)
n.
1. The actions or reactions of a person or animal in response to external or internal stimuli.
2. The manner in which something functions or operates.

be·hav′ior·al adj.

behavior

Conduct, bearing, demeanor, manner Psychology Manner of behaving—good or bad; mode of conduct; comportment. See Affective behavior, Catatonic behavior, Compensatory behavior, Dyssocial behavior, Eusocial behavior, High-risk behavior, Homosexual behavior, Novelty-seeking behavior, Preening behavior, Purging behavior, Sexual behavior, Suicidal behavior, Symbolic behavior, Withdrawing behavior.

be·hav·ior

(bē-hāv'yŏr)
1. Any response emitted by or elicited from an organism.
2. Any mental or motor act or activity.
3. Parts of a total response pattern.
Synonym(s): behaviour.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr. avoir, to have]

be·hav·ior

(bē-hāv'yŏr)
1. Any response emit-ted by or elicited from an organism.
2. Any mental or motor act or activity.
3. Specifically, parts of a total response pattern.
Synonym(s): behaviour.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr. avoir, to have]

Patient discussion about behavior

Q. Is there any explanation for this behavior? My son is 7 years old. He has a very uncooperative behavior with all his friends, his teachers and with us as well. He opposes for everything been taught to him by his teachers. He never cooperates with his friends and he always argues with everyone. He is very hostile to us and is always ready to fight. We have discussed about him to a doctor and he said it may be the signs of ADHD. Still he needs to be diagnosed officially which they may start after meeting my son. I was wondering about the reasons which can lead to such a behavior of my child? Is there any explanation for this behavior?

A. ADHA IS GENETIC IN SOME CASES-IT IS GOOD THAT YOU TOOK HIM TO A DR,YOUR SON WILL BE ALRIGHT,ONCE THE DR FINDS OUT WHAT MEDS WORK FOR HIM.GOOD LUCK--MRFOOT56

Q. rude/nasty behavior My sister was diagnosed with Bipolar and continues to take medication. She never went to Psychotherapy. Her demeanor is always very negative and her behavior is often critical and rude. My mother's attributes this to her ‘condition’ therefore reinforces her negative behavior. I haven't read anything about Bipolar that states rude/nasty behavior is a symptom. Is this type of behavior attributable to Bipolar?

A. damaez, I totally agree with you. Our bodies are so mal-nourished from the proper neccessities due to the way our foods are prepared that the body doesn't function properly. I believe that so many people are diagnosed with all types of disorders and put on medication and still act the same way with very little improvement. now a days they have a pill for everything. I have never heard of so many disorders in my life time as you hear about now. Bipolar is so easily thrown around that people use this excuse for being rude, disrespectful, and down right mean.You can be in a bad mood go see a doctor and be diagnosed as Bipolar. I work in the field of Human Services in a residential treatment program for DSS Adolescents and just about all that reside are Bipolar it is unreal. Sad but true.The more that is diagnosed the more pills,treatment and MONEY!

Q. What can I do to check on his behavior and make him regular… my 7 year son is seen with ADHD. I am not able to control on his high urges and irregularity and confusion which comes with this ADHD. What can I do to check on his behavior and make him regular…I know if I start now probably he will be better in coming years….

A. Very well………..you need to make some strategies for your child. Like create a daily routine for your child. Place your child`s belongings at the same place daily and at same time. If your child is doing anything, please keep the thing away which may distract him. Limit the choices from many things to 2 things only if possible. Describe anything in clear and short way. Make goals for your child like for positive behavior and appreciate him when he does. Please scold less or don’t shout on him for his mistakes at all rather make him understand by reducing on his demands or choices. Help your child to find his talents and make him work on them.

More discussions about behavior
References in periodicals archive ?
Our initial analysis of maintenance, based on the theory of behavioral momentum (Nevin, 1992), evaluated how both adaptive and problem behavior reacted when treatment was briefly terminated, that is, when destructive behavior, task completion, and manding were placed on extinction for 5 min.
The items included in the preference assessment were selected based on caregiver report and naturalistic observation, suggesting that the participants maintained destructive behavior. With all three participants, an iPad was associated with the highest level of engagement during the preference assessment and subsequently served as the reinforcing stimulus throughout the study for all three participants.
It's all too easy to get frustrated with your dog's destructive behavior. Remember that he's not choosing to do it out of spite or malice--he is panicked about his own survival without you, his pack, there to protect him.
My colleagues and I have found that destructive behavior may sometimes act as a precurrent response for spoken mands.
According to my friend and hunting buddy Seward Heaps, who is also a successful local psychologist, instances of suicides, domestic violence, and other destructive behavior increase tenfold during the Christmas season.
The purpose of the present study was to further extend applied analyses of response resurgence within the context of treatment of destructive behavior maintained, at least in part, by negative reinforcement.
Medical care, basic obedience training, the elderly dog, grooming, and destructive behavior are also covered.
Not after getting drunk and landing a rental car in a ditch, or after assaulting a police officer, or on hundreds of other occasions when he might have recognized his destructive behavior. In fact, he says, he used his battle with crystal to prolong his alcoholism, "I thought I was sober when I stopped using illegal drugs.
Mother/daughter team Diana and Julia offer twelve tips to raising a happy, fulfilled child in What All Children Want Their Parents To Know: 12 Keys To Raising A Happy Child; from teaching by example and allowing for mistakes and growth to curbing destructive behavior in constructive ways and choosing positive discipline.
Many send a dangerous message that could lead to destructive behavior. Joel Steinberg, professor of pediatrics at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, warns, "Parents should be very careful in selecting toys that may encourage [aggressive] behaviors, such as toy guns, knives, bow and arrows, or computer games and violent videos."
The destructive behavior of a young boy with learning and behavior problems was evaluated in a functional analysis in his classroom.