desquamation


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desquamation

 [des″kwah-ma´shun]
the shedding of epithelial elements, chiefly of the skin, in scales or sheets. adj., adj desquam´ative.

des·qua·ma·tion

(des'kwă-mā'shŭn),
The shedding of the cuticle in scales or of the outer layer of any surface.

desquamation

/des·qua·ma·tion/ (des″kwah-ma´shun) the shedding of epithelial elements, chiefly of the skin, in scales or sheets.desquam´ative

desquamation

[des′kwəmā′shən]
Etymology: L, desquamare, to take off scales
a normal process in which the cornified layer of the epidermis is sloughed in fine scales. Certain conditions, injuries, and medications accelerate desquamation and may cause peeling and the loss of deeper layers of the skin. Also called exfoliation. desquamate, v., desquamative, adj.

desquamation

Medtalk The sloughing of a mucocutaneous surface. See Potato chip desquamation.

des·qua·ma·tion

(des'kwă-mā'shŭn)
The shedding of the cuticle in scales or of the outer layer of any surface.

desquamation

(dĕs″kwă-mā′shŭn)
1. The peeling skin characteristic of postmature infants.
Enlarge picture
DESQUAMATION OF THE SKIN OF THE PALM
2. Shedding of the epidermis. See: illustration

furfuraceous desquamation

Shedding of branlike scales.

desquamation

Shedding, peeling or scaling of skin.

Desquamation

Shedding of the cells lining the insides of the air sacs. A feature of desquamative interstitial pneumonitis.

desquamation

normal, continuous loss (shedding) of keratin flakes (squames) from the outer layer of epidermis at the skin surface, so that overall skin thickness remains constant, even though keratinocytes continually generate at the basal layer (stratum basale)

desquamation (des·kw·māˑ·shn),

n sloughing off of the cornified epidermal layer. Also called
exfoliation.

des·qua·ma·tion

(des'kwă-mā'shŭn)
The shedding of the cuticle in scales or of the outer layer of any surface.

desquamation (des´kwəmā´shən),

n a naturally occurring process in which the outer layer of skin or mucosa cells is sloughed off.

desquamation

the shedding of epithelial elements, chiefly of the skin, in scales or sheets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both groups of patients showed a significant reduction in pruritus, erythema, vesicles, and desquamation from baseline across time at the end of 4 weeks (P < 0.
001) was statistically significant in early neonatal period, whereas physiological desquamation (z=4.
Herpes zoster ophthalmicus is an acute dermatomal infection that occurs with the reactivation of VZV It frequently causes vesicular desquamation in the periorbital region and the skin of the forehead (2).
Clinically, hair loss and diffuse desquamation was observed with multiple yellowish and brownish crusts at the area of the vertex, while the underlying skin was very erythematous (Fig.
Stratum corneum tryptic enzyme in normal epidermis: A missing link in the desquamation process?
Most cases present with minimal symptoms with complete recovery; others may present with a toxic shock-like syndrome known as VSSS characterized by hypotension, rash, palmar desquamation, and ARDS developing upon the onset of bacteremia in approximately 25% in the normal population [10] and in 13%--21% in children after bone marrow transplantation [18].
16 also demonstrated coagulative necrosis of the proximal tubule cells vacuolar degeneration epithelial desquamation collections of cellular debris within damaged tubules intraluminal cast formation mainly in distal convoluted tubules rupture of tubular membranes interstitial edema and infiltration with lymphocytes and plasma cells together with apoptotic bodies.
The apical cells in desquamation found in the dense layer, including these folds, showed large electron-lucent vesicles and were engaged in holocrine secretion (Fig.
Multiple nonblanchable violaceous rash with desquamation was observed on her face and distal extremities [Figure 1]a.
Partial desquamation of epithelium observed in tissue sections could be effect of process of biopsy collection.
In addition, fewer curcumin patients had moist desquamation, although it did not reduce erythema.
In later stages there may be vesiculation and desquamation of the epidermal cells leaving the area very sore and tender.