desorb

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desorb

 [de-sorb´]
to remove a substance from the state of absorption or adsorption.

desorb

/de·sorb/ (de-sorb´) to remove a substance from the state of absorption or adsorption.

desorb

to remove a substance from the state of absorption or adsorption.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In soils with linear desorption curves, the per cent P desorbed was also positively correlated with soil test P (M3-P) and DPS, but negatively correlated with sorption capacity ([r=0.
If there is not only few moisture but also few oxygen in the gas phase of the dryer, water as well as oxygen will be desorbed from the resin at the same time.
The second, slower stage was thought to be limited by the rate at which fipronil desorbed from the soil, and is similar to the observations of Eberbach (1998) for glyphosate.
When AO impacts the particles on the nanocomposites surface, it will be scattered, absorbed with further thermal accommodation or desorbed.
1983a) demonstrated that the amount of Cu that can be desorbed from some soil components is relatively small.
Unknown proteins are affinity captured on treated surfaces, desorbed and ionized by laser excitation, and detected according to molecular weight.
Sensitivity may be improved by the use of a larger volume, such as 50 mL, but in order to obtain acceptable resolution on the gas chromatograph, any hydrocarbon vapour present has to be first adsorbed on to a Tenax substrate; this is then thermally desorbed on to the chromatograph in an automated process.
The PVBS-AP resin adsorbed Hg(II) was placed in this medium and stirred for 2 h at room temperature (a primary experiment showed that the Hg(II) adsorbed on resin was almost desorbed completely when the contact time of resin adsorbed Hg(II) with this medium was about 50 min).
Table 4 presents the Cu concentrations in the supernatant following desorption and also shows, calculated from mass balances, the desorbed amount of Cu extracted from the soil.
2] desorption on the creep response was investigated by testing specimens that had been saturated and then desorbed for times ranging from 6 to 60 days.
Consequently, if a pH increase occurred, anions held to the soil positive charge by electrostatic forces will be desorbed upon decrease in the AEC or positive charge density.