desorb


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

desorb

 [de-sorb´]
to remove a substance from the state of absorption or adsorption.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
So called "quick"-crushing techniques allow test both desorbed and residual gas in a matter of days due to crashing fresh core immediately after delivering it in a laboratory.
About 79% of adsorbed lead ions were desorbed. Desorption efficiency was calculated using the equation as given below:
Specifically, the adsorption capacity of the native soil is larger than that of soil with the removal of organic matter, whereas the ability to desorb Cu(II) is opposite.
When the coal is suddenly exposed to the atmosphere, the methane gas which is ejected or poured out contains the desorbed methane gas and the original free gas in the fractured network.
Consider gas solubility in water, day in 1000, when gas increased 57% solubility in water, the vapor pressure of the fluid is reduced by 33%.The higher the gas solubility in water is, it is easier for gas to desorb, the higher the gas permeability is, and the greater the pressure drops of gas phase.
The use of MEA to scrub flue gas is energy intensive since recycling the solution requires boiling it to desorb, or rid, the C[O.sub.2] before recycle of the MEA solution back into contact with the flue gas.
During inhaling the air these toxic particles (PM2.5um) get entry into the body, desorb in different fluids like blood circulatory system of humans and move along with blood stream causing lung cancer, liver cancer, kidney failure, skin disorders and cardiovascular diseases.
In MALDI and DESI, "non-destructive" techniques are utilised with soft ionization sources to desorb and ionise sample surface molecules for MS analysis.
Wool will absorb the 1 litre of water that the average person perspires every night and then desorb it naturally back to its normal state during the day.
The research at the Georgia Institute of Technology indicates that ultraviolet photons emitted by the sun likely cause H2O molecules to either quickly desorb or break apart.
[N.sub.2] is more volatile and less strongly adsorbing than methane, so it travels quickly through the system, causing methane to desorb earlier than when C[O.sub.2] is injected.