desmoid tumours

desmoid tumours

Slow-growing fibroid growths that, although not encapsulated and not capable of remote spread (metastases), are locally-invasive. Their chromosomes do not suggest malignancy. They carry oestrogen receptors and affect women four times as often as men and often arise at the site of previous surgery. They are common in GARDNER'S SYNDROME.
References in periodicals archive ?
Originally from Trefor on the Llyn Peninsula but now living in Pwllheli, Mr Dafydd received a course of radiotherapy treatment for aggressive fibromatosis - a rare condition marked by the presence of desmoid tumours - on his chest last autumn.
Selective oestrogen receptor modulators in desmoid tumours.
Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) or extra-abdominal desmoid tumours are rare tumours of fibroblastic origin involving the proliferation of cytologically benign fibrocytes.
Desmoid tumours are rare monoclonal fibroblastic proliferations arising in the soft tissue and accounting for less than 0.
This makes differentiation from desmoid tumours difficult clinically.
Radiation therapy for aggressive desmoid tumours (desmoid tumours): results of a national Patterns of Care Study.
Desmoid tumours are a rare group of locally aggressive, non-malignant tumours of fibroblastic origin that can result in significant morbidity due to local invasion and may even result in a fatal outcome when located around a vital organ.
The 26-year-old, from Orrell Park, was diagnosed with having three desmoid tumours and FAP which is a genetic disorder that can leave victims prone to bowel cancer.
Earlier this month she shared the news that her fiancee Michelle Rounds was diagnosed with desmoid tumours, a very rare affliction.
Desmoid tumours are rare, locally aggressive tumours with no known potential for metastasis or differentiation, accounting for only 0.
Rebecca, who was forced to give up her job at a special needs school because of ill health, said: "It is rare to have the FAP gene and even rarer to get the desmoid tumours I have in my stomach.
Most desmoid tumours typically tend to grow slowly and do not metastasise, although their growth pattern remains quite aggressive, with organ infiltration, local tissue destruction and organ compression/displacement.