desire

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desire

noun A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for a state of sexual arousal; it is little used in working medical parlance.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sexual response cycle

Physiology A term that encompasses the phases of a sexual act from prearousal to denouement; the SRC is divided into 4 phases. Cf Sexual dysfunction.
Sexual Response Cycle
Desire Consists of fantasies about sexual activity, desire to engage therein
Excitement Subjective component of sexual excitement is accompanied by physiologic changes, in ♂, penile tumescence and erection, in ♀ pelvic vasocongestion, vaginal lubrication, and swelling of external genitalia
Orgasm Peaking of sexual pleasure with release of sexual tension, rhythmic contraction of perineal muscles in ♂, ejaculation, in ♀, contractions of outer13 of vagina; in both, anal sphincter contracts rhythmically
Resolution Denouement Muscle relaxation, and a sense of well-being; during resolution, ♂ are unerectable for a variable period of time; ♀ remain on 'red alert'
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
What, I think, is clearly established, is that a man's actions and beliefs may be wholly dominated by a desire of which he is quite unconscious, and which he indignantly repudiates when it is suggested to him.
I believe an "unconscious" desire is merely a causal law of our behaviour,* namely, that we remain restlessly active until a certain state of affairs is realized, when we achieve temporary equilibrium If we know beforehand what this state of affairs is, our desire is conscious; if not, unconscious.
Something closely analogous to knowledge and desire, as regards its effects on behaviour, exists among animals, even where what we call "consciousness" is hard to believe in; something equally analogous exists in ourselves in cases where no trace of "consciousness" can be found.
Well, I said, and hunger and thirst, and the desires in general, and again willing and wishing,--all these you would refer to the classes already mentioned.
Admitting this to be true of desire generally, let us suppose a particular class of desires, and out of these we will select hunger and thirst, as they are termed, which are the most obvious of them?
But here a confusion may arise; and I should wish to guard against an opponent starting up and saying that no man desires drink only, but good drink, or food only, but good food; for good is the universal object of desire, and thirst being a desire, will necessarily be thirst after good drink; and the same is true of every other desire.
SOCRATES: And if I went on to say: That is what I desire to know, Meno; tell me what is the quality in which they do not differ, but are all alike;--would you be able to answer?
'Virtue is the desire of things honourable and the power of attaining them.'
As Adam was a-working outside of Eden-Wall, He used the Earth, he used the Seas, he used the Air and all; And out of black disaster He arose to be the master Of Earth and Water, Air and Fire, But never reached his heart's desire!(The Apple Tree's cut down!)
And whether I yielded to drink, as at Benicia, or whether I refrained, as at the laundry, in my brain the seeds of desire for alcohol were germinating.
I am rich enough to know whatever I desire to know, and I can promise you I am not wanting in curiosity.
"When you have purchased the estate I desire, I want constant relays of horses at ten leagues apart along the northern and southern road."