desiccation


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desiccation

 [des″ĭ-ka´shun]
the act of drying.

des·ic·ca·tion

(des'i-kā'shŭn),
The process of being desiccated.
Synonym(s): dehydration (4) , exsiccation (1)

desiccation

Medtalk → Vox populi Drying

des·ic·ca·tion

(des'i-kā'shŭn)
The process of being desiccated.
Synonym(s): dehydration (4) , exsiccation (1) .

desiccation

the process by which a substance is dried out and the moisture removed. This is often carried out in a desiccator, which contains a substance which will take up water, such as calcium chloride.

desiccation

separation of a skin lesion from underlying healthy tissue, using low-current electrosurgery

desiccation

The process of becoming dry. See dry eye.

des·ic·ca·tion

(des'i-kā'shŭn)
The process of being desiccated.
Synonym(s): dehydration (4) , exsiccation (1) .

desiccation (des´ikā´shən),

n an excessive loss of moisture; the process of drying up. See also electrocoagulation.

desiccation

the act of drying.

desiccation keratitis
see keratoconjunctivitis sicca.
References in periodicals archive ?
As it has been suggested that for bryophyte species improved water absorption and holding characteristics are most likely mechanisms of increased growth (Rixen & Mulder, 2005), it would be interesting to link the performance of PSII with the water holding capacity of bryophyte species in natural conditions at different levels of water availability to demonstrate putative adaptive mechanisms of the photochemistry of photosynthesis against desiccation.
The scorpions receiving the desiccation treatment lost a significantly greater percentage of their body mass (-14.
Our specific objectives were to determine 1) the lethal time of treatment for mortality of larvae, 2) the lethal percentage weight loss of larvae, 3) the desiccation rate of larvae, 4) the relationship between vacuum time and weight loss of larvae, 5) the relation between desiccation rate and wood moisture content (MC), and 6) the effects of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity on the desiccation rate.
The impacts of stresses such as desiccation vary with life-history stage.
WALTERS (2000) reported that there is a gradient of desiccation tolerance among seeds, ranging from intolerant (highly recalcitrant) to the most tolerant (classical orthodox), and the minimum water content varies according to the species.
In this context, the aim of the present investigation is to analyse the changes in the isoenzyme patterns of the major enzymes involved the scavenging of ROSs in the desiccation stressed fronds of the terrestrial forking fern Dicranopteris linearis.
lepidophylla, also known as bird's nest moss) returns to a green appearance approximately twenty-four hours after rehydration when photosynthesis and respiration recommence normal levels (Pampurova and Van Dijck, "The Desiccation Tolerant Secrets" 285).
Metabolic changes play a role in desiccation survival, previous studies have indicated that glycogen shift to trehalose during insect-killing nematode Steinernema feltiae dehydration (Gal et al.
Finot reported, "The rain ruined the desiccation trial.
Soon after desiccation levels were reached, the achenes had their internal morphology evaluated by X-ray, and their physiological quality and seed vigor estimated.