desexualize

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desexualize

(dē-sĕks′ū-ăl-īz) [″ + sexus, sex]
To castrate; to remove sexual traits.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Yet for Hahn-Hahn, as for Pfeiffer, Oriental women in public spaces became desexualized, and she connected them with death and the uncanny.
Intriguingly, the latest attempt to promote K-pop in the United States draws on its desexualized romanticism.
The reveiling process desexualized women--Islam acknowledges female sexuality as a potential cause of fitna or chaos.
So in Hamlet, "libidinal trends belonging to the Oedipus complex [and to Sophocles's play] are in part desexualized and sublimated .
Whenever the incidents in Ungar's fiction begin to resemble masochistic fantasy, as they often do, the descriptions become simultaneously desexualized and obscene.
In the process of idealizing the peasant woman, Mondry contends, Uspenskii desexualized her body and indulged a fantasy about' physically strong maidens', thus revealing a 'Christian anxiety around corporeality' (p.
Historical perspective on the evolution of such books helps us understand that early texts sanitized and desexualized young women into creatures concerned only with proper dress, perfectly coifed hair, and romantic interests that operated from a distance.
Going to a store and not being able to find something that fits can really make you feel desexualized.
Unlike the better known gay television series, Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, on My Fabulous Gay Wedding gay men are not constructed as offering a desexualized queer pedagogy focussed on "teaching domesticity and care of the self to facilitate heterosexual coupling" (McCarthy 2004: 98).
That theatrical quality dwindled in the later, desexualized spin-off series.
Even as she is displayed as a repentant desexualized wife, the audience is reminded of Anne's adultery.
As Lamas indicates early in her essay, the Virgin Mary, the desexualized mother, is the ideal--an ideal questioned in Marysa Navarro's critique of the notion of Marianismo later in the volume.