desexualize

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desexualize

(dē-sĕks′ū-ăl-īz) [″ + sexus, sex]
To castrate; to remove sexual traits.
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Or it may represent a move towards a technological desexualization of the organic--the prize for the kissing competition is a "strambo gioiello in forma di labbra meccanizzate" (29)--and the sexualization of the inorganic: "novelle palpitanti"; "i silicati virili della sabbia"; "un piccolo agile intimo aeroplano quasi corporale" (50, 52, 55).
10) Vikki Bell, "Beyond the 'Thorny Question': Feminism, Foucault and the Desexualization of Rape", International Journal of the Sociology of Law 19 (1991): 83, 89.
And secondly, is it not the very point that sublimation, in supposing the desexualization of libido, makes categories such as 'unbridled' jouissance secondary to the ultimate aims of its activity?
One manifestation of this secondary shame is what Warner (quoting Theodore Adorno) refers to as "a desexualization of sexuality itself," exemplified by the distinctly unsexy notion of a "healthy sex life" (39) as well as by the gay rights movement's "desexualized identity politics" and its "becoming more and more enthralled with respectability.
28) Lange reads Caroline's embrace of Raphael as an imagined lover as the desexualization of reality in favor of a sexualization of art, where sexuality does not involve restrictions on her identity (80-83).
The desexualization of the middle class matron clarifies both Cleo's reluctance to engage in recurring sexual relations with her husband and her inability to honor her sister's impoverished but sexually fulfilling marriage.
To the extent that women with disabilities have been left out of research on sexuality and aging, Welner (1997) suggests that this amounts to a desexualization of disabled women.
What dramatization, sanitization, and desexualization follow from this general inflation of psychic economies across the whole of social space?
Heyst's desexualization has its base in abulia; his behavior toward women becomes gentle, pacific and disembodied.
However, such desexualization or "disembodiment" is hardly a desirable end.
In particular, she describes patterns of assimilation, normalization, desexualization, silencing, and an emphasis on the individual and de-emphasis on minority membership and affiliation.
Though Bersani finds much to admire in queer commentaries such as these, in Homos he warns against what he considers the dangers of despecification and desexualization posed by the emergence of the term queer.