desensitize

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desensitize

 [de-sen´sĭ-tīz]
1. to deprive of sensation.
2. to subject to desensitization.

de·sen·si·tize

(dē-sen'si-tīz),
1. To reduce or remove any form of sensitivity.
2. To effect desensitization (1).
3. In dentistry, to eliminate or subdue the painful response of exposed, vital dentin to irritative agents or thermal changes.

desensitize

(dē-sĕn′sĭ-tīz′)
tr.v. desensi·tized, desensi·tizing, desensi·tizes
Immunology To make (an individual) nonreactive or insensitive to an antigen.

de·sen′si·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.
de·sen′si·tiz′er n.

desensitize

[dēsen′sitīz]
Etymology: L, de + sentire, to feel
1 (in immunology) to render an individual insensitive or less sensitive to any of the various antigens.
2 (in psychiatry) to relieve an emotionally disturbed person of the stress of phobias and neuroses by encouraging discussion of the anxieties and the stressful experiences that cause the emotional problems involved.
3 (in dentistry) to remove or reduce the painful response of vital exposed dentin to irritating substances and temperature changes.

de·sen·si·tize

(dē-sen'si-tīz)
1. To reduce or remove any form of sensitivity.
2. To effect desensitization (1).
3. dentistry To eliminate or subdue the painful response of exposed, vital dentin to irritative agents or thermal changes.

de·sen·si·tize

(dē-sen'si-tīz)
In dentistry, to eliminate or subdue the painful response of exposed, vital dentin to irritative agents or thermal changes.

desensitize

1. to deprive of sensation.
2. to subject to desensitization.
References in periodicals archive ?
A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study of the efficacy of Clinpro XT varnish and Gluma dentin desensitizer on dentin hypersensitivity.
His studies with the novel compound sazetidine-A, developed in the Kellar lab in 2005, led to the proposal to develop selective receptor desensitizers for smoking cessation.
Del, for instance, has made several additions to its Orajel line over the past few months, adding such items as protective mouth sore discs, maximum-strength toothache powder and advanced tooth desensitizer.
Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of some desensitizer agents in reducing cervical dentin hypersensitivity over a 6month period.
A few drops of Gluma Desensitizer (Heraeus Kulzer, Armonk, NY, USA) were applied with a cotton pellet using a gentle but firm rubbing motion.
Oxa-Gel and LILT showed the higher scores of sensitivity when compared to Gluma Desensitizer and Seal&Protect.
It was observed that Gluma Desensitizer and Seal&Protect showed immediate effect after application and no statistically significant differences were observed between the two therapies.
The Gluma Desensitizer product contains 5% glutaraldehyde and 35% hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA).
However, in spite of the satisfactory results found in literature (23-26), it is reported that water spray can remove the oxalate crystals on the dentin surface, because the desensitizer agent is short-lived.
Special products can be developed to conserve counter space, including desensitizers mounted under counters or conveyers.