scramble

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Drug slang A regional term for crack cocaine
Graduate education A popular term for the ‘mad rush’ to secure a residency slot by US medical students who didn’t get one through the Match

(the) 'scramble'

Graduate education A popular term for the 'mad rush' to secure a residency slot by US medical students who did not obtain a position through the Match. See Match.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although some companies selling these devices claim to sell only to individuals who have permission of their cable companies to use them, as far as we know none of the more than 11,000 cable operators in the country allow their customers to use their own equipment to descramble cable programming."
The Pixel 3 will have a new chip, called Titan, to store keys to the most sensitive information, including those needed to unlock the phone and descramble stored data.
(74) The statute defines the act of circumventing a technological measure as to "descramble a scrambled work, to decrypt an encrypted work, or otherwise to avoid, bypass, remove, deactivate, or impair a technological measure, without the authority of the copyright owner." (75) Under the statute, one is effectively punished for possessing the technology that enables its user to decode encrypted copyrighted works.
Small, multifunction codecs (combination encoder and decoder) can both scramble and descramble on-site.
It also establishes a voluntary basis for enforcing copy protection measures in systems licensed to descramble and view motion picture content.
That is, the technological advancement that enabled cable television companies to scramble their pay-per-view stations is the same technology that individuals are using to descramble these stations.
As an advanced IP gateway, it demodulates, descrambles, and de-multiplexes for signal reception and for distributing the live channels over IP networks.
"Although most of the image planes are blurry, ISAM descrambles the light to produce a fully focused, three-dimensional image," adds lead project researcher Tyler Ralston.