derogation

(redirected from derogations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

derogation

The declaration by a UK governmental agency or body that it is not bound by a group of regulations, with the risk that said derogation can be declared unlawful by the overseeing body.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the parts of England where wet ground conditions will make it necessary to delay carrying out specific Environmental Stewardship options, agreement holders should contact Natural England as soon as possible for advice about a derogation.
One of the most typical examples of a derogation - according to an EU document dated July 4, 2006 - allowing member states to apply for tax reduction exemption concerns "consumption (of fuel) in certain geographical areas".
His comment is seen as response to Akinci who said last week that permanent derogations from the acquis should be viewed as a "natural right" of Turkish Cypriots instead of a restriction to the rights of Greek Cypriots or other EU nationals.
FARMERS are being reminded of the December deadline for Glastir capital works and to request a derogation if they are struggling to complete their works because of bad weather.
"If I were Turkey, I would argue that the derogation does not apply to the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) as it is an independent country."
A final derogation nevertheless authorised on-board processing for fishermen holding a special permit, provided all the parts of the shark were landed together (fins attached or removed).
L'exemple du lotissement An-naim sur une superficie de huit hectares montre clairement comment des derogations etaient synonymes [beaucoup moins que]d'autorisations de s'enrichir[beaucoup plus grand que].
The temporary derogation on animal burial, applied by Mr Davies last week, was due to end at midnight on Tuesday.
"We will ensure that appropriate derogations are available to help our Environmental Stewardship agreement customers to deal with some of the problems that this winter's very bad weather is causing."
The European Commission is now working on practical rules - a set of guidelines - clarifying how farmers can use the term "mountain product" and what derogations would apply.
On the possibility of departing from limit values and derogations allowing member states to define more lenient emissions standards (Article 15.4), the final compromise simply deletes one word from the 4 June version of the text: the member states will have to prove that the costs' of implementing the limit values associated with BAT are disproportionate.